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NLN honors both the WSU College of Nursing and Associate Dean Renee Hoeksel

The WSU College of Nursing and one of its faculty were honored by the National League for Nursing (NLN) in a ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. Left to right: Renee Hoeksel, Executive Associate Dean; Joyce Griffin-Sobel, Dean and Professor; and Rumay Alexander, NLN President.
The WSU College of Nursing and one of its faculty were honored by the National League for Nursing (NLN) in a ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. Left to right: Renee Hoeksel, Executive Associate Dean; Joyce Griffin-Sobel, Dean and Professor; and Rumay Alexander, NLN President.
The WSU College of Nursing and one of its faculty were honored by the National League for Nursing (NLN) in a ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. Left to right: Renee Hoeksel, Executive Associate Dean; Joyce Griffin-Sobel, Dean and Professor; and Rumay Alexander, NLN President.

There are more than 800 nursing programs in the United States and more than 400,000 nurses who’ve earned masters or doctoral degrees.

So it’s notable that the National League for Nursing (NLN) honored both the Washington State University College of Nursing and one of its faculty, Executive Associate Dean and Professor Renee Hoeksel, at the organization’s 2017 Educational Summit this past weekend.

Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel accepted a certificate naming the WSU College of Nursing a Center of Excellence in Nursing Education in a ceremony Saturday evening. She was joined on the stage by Associate Dean Anita Hunter; Hoeksel; and Senior Instructor Laura Wintersteen-Arleth.

Moments later, Hoeksel was inducted as a Fellow of the NLN Academy of Nursing Education. In announcing Hoeksel’s fellowship, Karen Pardue, Chair of the Academy of Nursing Education Review Panel, lauded her work in establishing new RN-BSN pathways across five western states.

The 14 new fellows and one honorary fellow “have contributed above and beyond the responsibilities associated with their employment, made contributions to nursing education that have been broad in scope and not limited to their own classrooms or schools,” Pardue noted.

Gloria Jacobson, chair of the Centers of Excellence review panel, told conference attendees that the program recognizes schools of nursing and health care organizations that set high standards, are committed to continuous quality improvement, and demonstrate sustained, evidence-based, and substantive innovation. The WSU College of Nursing was among 15 universities and health care organizations recognized, and the only school in the Pacific Northwest.

“The school started out as the first intercollegiate nursing program in the nation, and now has a full range of undergraduate and graduate degrees, a multimillion-dollar research portfolio, and courses offered at campuses statewide,” Jacobson said.

Other universities receiving the Centers of Excellence designation are: Ball State University, Duke University, Emory University, Indiana University, Kent State University, Purdue University, Rush University, Samford University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Kansas, Villanova University, and Widener University.

Representing the WSU College of Nursing at the NLN awards ceremony on Sept. 16, 2017, were: Dean and Professor Joyce Griffin-Sobel; Associate Dean Anita Hunter; Associate Dean Renee Hoeksel; and Senior Instructor Laura Wintersteen-Arleth.
Representing the WSU College of Nursing at the NLN awards ceremony on Sept. 16, 2017, were: Dean and Professor Joyce Griffin-Sobel; Associate Dean Anita Hunter; Associate Dean Renee Hoeksel; and Senior Instructor Laura Wintersteen-Arleth.

Grant will create fellowships for researchers with disabilities at WSU

Portrait of Dr. Jae Kennedy
Portrait of Dr. Jae Kennedy
Dr. Jae Kennedy, chair and professor of the College of Nursing’s Department of Health Policy and Administration.

Research scientists with disabilities are underrepresented in the health sciences, yet such scholars bring needed perspective to understanding and improving health policies and services for people with disabilities.

A new federal grant will help WSU hire three post-doctoral students with disabilities to become academic researchers, with the goal of having them go on to faculty positions at major universities or leadership roles in federal research agencies and nonprofit foundations.

The five-year, $750,000 award from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research will provide a competitive salary, full benefits, and support for any needed workplace assistance or adaptive technologies.

Called the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living Fellowship (CHRIL-F), the positions “will bring new scholars with disabilities to the table, and provide them the skills and support they will need to enlarge the policy debate,” said Jae Kennedy, principal investigator, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Administration in the WSU College of Nursing.

The three fellows will be hired by WSU in staggered terms over the five-year grant, and will spend 18 months taking graduate courses, working on research grant proposals and journal manuscripts, and developing individual plans of research. They can spend three to six months of the fellowship at one or more affiliate sites, including Washington DC, Houston, or Lawrence, Kansas.

Grant funding can also be used for conference travel, which typically is more difficult and costly for people with disabilities, but which is critical for networking and presenting research work.  The specific uses of support funds will depend on the needs of the fellows hired, but could include office space reconfiguration, or hiring a personal aide or interpreter.

With this grant, “We propose building a small but sturdy pipeline for disability researchers with disabilities by designing postdoc positions specific to their needs,” Kennedy said.

Besides Kennedy, the project team includes Roberta Carlin, director of the American Association on Health and Disability; Lex Frieden, a professor of bioinformatics and rehabilitation at the University of Texas in Houston; Jean Hall, a professor and director of the Institute for Health and Disability Policy at the University of Kansas; and Elizabeth Wood, a research associate in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at WSU.

The same team makes up the Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living (CHRIL), established by Kennedy under a $2.5 million federal grant to bring together disability advocates and researchers to investigate how the Affordable Care Act and related legislation affects the lives of adults with disabilities.

“The members of the CHRIL have personal, professional, and political experience with disability, and many contacts throughout the research and disability communities,” Kennedy said. “We are not just advocates and researchers who happen to have disabilities: disability is central to what we do and why we do it.”

Two WSU nurse cadets take top honors at ROTC summer training

Photo of marching regiment
The 10th Regiment Advanced Camp of ROTC Cadet Summer Training at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Photo by Amber Vincent.

 

Two ROTC nurse cadets from the WSU College of Nursing took top honors at Cadet Summer Training in Kentucky.

Koby Binks, BSN ’17, and Candace Madriaga, a junior in the nursing program, were both honored with the Norton Healthcare Award during different sessions of the summer training program. The Norton Award is given to the nurse cadet who best demonstrates the ability to perform under stress and to apply critical thinking skills when making decisions.

(Left) Cadet Koby Binks, an ROTC graduate of the WSU College of Nursing, receives the Norton Healthcare Award for nurse cadets at Cadet Summer Training. Photo by Mattie Cook. (Right) Candace Madriaga, an ROTC student at the WSU College of Nursing, was honored with the Norton Healthcare Award at Cadet Summer Training. Photo by Madison Thompson.

 

Both Binks and Madriaga entered the WSU College of Nursing from Eastern Washington University’s ROTC program. The College of Nursing reserves seats in each new class for Army ROTC nurses from WSU and EWU.

Binks said the lessons he learned at the WSU College of Nursing helped him help his platoon during the month-long summer training program at Fort Knox.

He told them, “Let’s talk about how important it is to change socks” as they went through training exercises in 95-degree heat with 100 percent humidity, he said. “I talked about the science of electrolytes, I talked about hydration and what that means to the body,” said Binks, 28.

After completing a nine-week Basic Officer Leadership Course, Binks hopes to work in Spokane and fulfill his military service through the Army Reserves.

Madriaga, 22, said she’s “97 percent certain” she’ll become active-duty military after she graduates from the College of Nursing.

“I want to care for those who are fighting for our country,” she said.

Some 8,200 cadets went through basic and advanced camp at Fort Knox this summer, events designed to help ROTC cadets improve their skills and leadership qualities.

WSU College of Nursing named a national Center of Excellence

Group photo of faculty and staff at the WSU College of Nursing, which has been named a Center of Excellence.
Group photo of faculty and staff at the WSU College of Nursing, which has been named a Center of Excellence.
Faculty and staff at the WSU College of Nursing.

The WSU College of Nursing has been named a Center of Excellence by the National League for Nursing, an honor given to only 15 schools and health care facilities nationwide in 2017.

The award recognizes the College of Nursing’s statewide programs, innovation, research, community outreach, and its commitment to diversity.

The National League for Nursing is a professional organization with 40,000 individual members and 1,200 institutional members. It provides professional development, testing services, research grants and public policy initiatives on nursing education and research.

Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel
Dean and Professor Joyce Griffin-Sobel

“Expert faculty create expert nurses. The WSU College of Nursing has been producing the finest nurses in Washington for close to 50 years,” said Dean and Professor Joyce Griffin-Sobel, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN. “Being named a Center of Excellence, the only college in the Northwest to be honored in this manner, recognizes our innovative, learner-centered teaching, enhanced by a sophisticated simulation program for hands-on, experiential learning.”

The WSU College of Nursing graduates more nurses with bachelor’s degrees than any other university in the state, is a leader in education using simulation, and had research and grant funding of more than $7 million last year. By bringing a diverse student body into health care and serving disadvantaged communities, the College of Nursing helps WSU continue to fulfill its land-grant mission in a modern world.

Anne R. Bavier, PhD, RN, FAAN, and president of the National League for Nursing, notes that Centers of Excellence “help raise the bar for all nursing programs.”

The WSU College of Nursing was named a Center of Excellence for “Enhancing Student Learning and Professional Development,” one of four categories for which honors are awarded. Other nursing schools recognized in the same category include Rush University, Purdue University, Ball State University, and the University of Kansas.

Among the achievements highlighted in the College’s Center of Excellence application were:

  • The College has statewide reach, offering degrees on WSU campuses in Spokane, the Tri-Cities and Vancouver, Washington, and at sites in Yakima and Walla Walla.
  • Since 2005, the College has increased its research capacity by 400 percent.
  • The student body is both ethnically and demographically diverse. From 2013-2016, the WSU College of Nursing’s undergraduate enrollment included 43 percent first-generation college students, and 30 percent non-white. Over the past decade, the College tripled the number of under-represented minority students, rural, and first-generation students who received bachelor’s degrees in nursing.
  • The Program of Excellence in Clinical Performance and Simulation operates a state-of-the-art Simulation Lab that serves students from many WSU health-sciences programs. The College also trains community partners there, including the 141st Air National Guard, students from Spokane Community College, the Washington Association of Nurse Anesthetists, and the University of Washington’s MEDEX Physician Assistant program.
  • Students, under the guidance of College of Nursing faculty, have staffed first aid stations at sporting events, conducted children’s health and sports physical screenings, and offered free clinics for uninsured and undocumented people.

Dean Griffin-Sobel said of the honor of being named a Center of Excellence, “Our faculty ensure that our graduates, at the entry and advanced levels, are prepared to meet the health care needs of our citizens, to reduce the significant access problems that exist in our state, and to increase primary care practice. As a land grant institution, there is no higher calling.”

CBTSim certified by international police training organization

Portrait of Lois James in front of her CBTSim simulator
Portrait of Dr. Lois James, the researcher who developed CBTSim
Dr. Lois James of the WSU College of Nursing

A simulator developed by a WSU College of Nursing researcher to help police officers recognize their biases has been certified by an international law enforcement training organization.

It’s only the second “implicit bias training” class to receive the Seal of Excellence from the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST). The association sets standards for police training programs to ensure consistency across the country.

CBTSim, or Counter Bias Training Simulation, was developed by Dr. Lois James, an Assistant Professor at the WSU College of Nursing. Her co-investigator is Dr. Stephen James, Assistant Research Professor at the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at WSU.

CBTSim is a portable unit that uses full-sized video screens to present police officers with realistic scenarios where they’re required to make deadly-force decisions. The scenarios are based on 30 years of data, and “may elicit a response from the student based on their inherent biases and not from an actual threat presented,” noted the evaluators who awarded the Seal of Excellence to CBTSim. The simulation is followed by discussion and debriefing among the trainer and the participants.

“Receiving the IADLEST National Certification Program™ seal of excellence is a significant achievement for CBTsim,” Dr. Lois James said. “Requirements for certification are a firm grounding in scientific evidence on the training topic, as well as a rigorous plan for evaluating trainee progress. For an implicit bias training class to be stamped with this seal of approval is rare, and I hope will speak to the value of CBTsim for police departments nationwide.”

With the certification from the national training organization, CBTSim will be listed on a roster of approved training programs for police and sheriff’s departments across the country.

James developed CBTSim with support from the WSU College of Nursing and a grant from the university’s Office of Commercialization. She is currently marketing the training to law enforcement agencies nationwide.

Lois James, WSU Spokane College of Nursing, 509-324-7442, cell 509-385-9386, lois_james@wsu.edu

Dr. Janet Katz named a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing

portrait of Dr. Janet Katz

Janet Katz

Dr. Janet Katz, Professor at the WSU College of Nursing, has been named a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Dr. Katz will be inducted into the Academy in a ceremony in October.

She is one of 173 nurse leaders worldwide selected for induction as an Academy fellow. Selection criteria includes evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care, and sponsorship by two current Academy fellows. Applicants are judged based in part on how their nursing career has influenced health policies and public health.

Dr. Katz has worked extensively to increase the diversity of the nursing workforce, and is currently principle investigator on a federal grant to increase the number of disadvantaged, Native American and Hispanic students from rural areas in health sciences professions. She also is principle investigator for a project focusing on preventing substance abuse and suicide among young members of the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Her research has included academic-practice partnerships with Native American tribes in Washington, Idaho and Oregon. She coordinates nursing programs for the Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Sciences Institute held annually at WSU Spokane, and teaches community health. She holds a PhD in Education, and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in nursing.

With the induction of the latest group of fellows in October, the American Academy of Nursing will have more than 2,500 fellows in all 50 states and 29 countries around the world.

“The fellows are nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy and research,” the American Academy of Nursing said in a news release. “Academy fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans, and renowned scientific researchers.”

For more information on the WSU College of Nursing, visit nursing.wsu.edu.

For more information on the American Academy of Nursing, visit http://www.aannet.org/home

Gordana Dermody named to national CNL certification board

Portrait of Gordana (Dana) Dermody
Portrait of Gordana (Dana) Dermody
Gordana Dermody, Phd, RN, CNL

Gordana Dermody, PhD, RN, CNL, has been named to the board of the Commission on Nurse Certification, which manages the Clinical Nurse Leader certification program. Dermody, a Clinical Assistant Professor at the WSU College of Nursing, will join the board on July 1 and will serve a three-year term.

The Commission on Nurse Certification (CNC) Board of Commissioners is an autonomous arm of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and is responsible for the policies and administration of the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) certification program.

The CNL credential is given to graduates of master’s and post-master’s programs who meet all eligibility requirements and pass the CNL Certification Examination. Earning the credential demonstrates proficiency on a set of national standards and a broad base of knowledge beyond the RN licensure. Since the CNL was introduced in 2006, 5,350 nurses have earned the credential.

Dermody’s nursing experience includes hospice, long-term care, occupational health, acute care medical oncology, stroke and cardiac care. She became CNL certified in 2011 and is a past board member of the Clinical Nurse Leader Association. She has worked to improve quality of care in nursing internationally, most recently on promoting the Clinical Nurse Leader role in Japan.

Barbara Richardson honored for founding Youth Leadership Spokane

Portrait of Barb Richardson holding a microphone with a group of teenagers behind her.
Portrait of Barb Richardson holding a microphone with a group of teenagers behind her.
Dr. Barb Richardson with participants in the Health Care Teen Challenge in 2016. Photo by Cori Kogan.

 

More than 600 area teenagers have learned civic responsibility, leadership, communications and team-building in the last 20 years through Youth Leadership Spokane, a program founded by Barbara Richardson, now a faculty member at the WSU College of Nursing.

“There was a critical need to engage youth in our community,” Richardson said Friday of her work in 1996-97 getting Youth Leadership Spokane off the ground. “Hard for me to believe that I started YLS before this year’s participants were even born.”

With a background as a pediatric nurse and nurse educator, Richardson was a 1992 graduate of Leadership Spokane, a civic education and networking organization. Once she launched the youth version, she would go on to serve as director of the program for 13 years, as well as an elected member of the Spokane Public Schools board for six years.

She left Youth Leadership Spokane to pursue a PhD at the WSU College of Nursing, and now directs Riverpoint Interprofessional Education and Research, where she brings together students from different colleges and programs to help foster teamwork in a health care setting. She’s been honored with a YWCA of Spokane Professional Woman of Achievement award in 2006, and the National Community Leadership Association Distinguished Leadership Award in 2002.

“Barb Richardson is an example of the leadership we see across the nursing profession,” said WSU College of Nursing Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel. “Nurses impact their communities in so many ways.”

Brian Newberry, executive director of Leadership Spokane, said Richardson “exemplifies what we hope for in our great alumni – stepping up.” He added, “Barb is an outstanding alumni whose vision and dream are now a reality that keeps lighting the way.”

Richardson was honored at the Leadership Spokane graduation ceremony Thursday. She said she’s most proud of the fact that the Youth Leadership Spokane program she spearheaded has continued to grow and thrive, “making a positive difference in the lives of 600-plus diverse teens, providing them with opportunities to contribute in countless positive ways to our community, and giving them the knowledge, skills, and experiences to make servant leadership a part of their lives wherever they may go.”

Dr. Renee Hoeksel named a fellow in NLN Academy of Nursing Education

Renee Hoeksel

Renee Hoeksel

Dr. Renee Hoeksel, Executive Associate Dean and Professor at the Washington State University College of Nursing, has been named a fellow of the National League for Nursing’s Academy of Nursing Education. Dr. Hoeksel will be inducted into the Academy at a ceremony in September.

The National League for Nursing established the Academy of Nursing Education in 2007 to foster excellence in nursing education and to recognize nurse educators who have made sustained and significant contributions to the field.

Dr. Hoeksel, who teaches at the WSU College of Nursing in Vancouver, Washington, has been lauded for her academic leadership, innovative teaching strategies, and collaborative educational and community partnerships. During the last 27 years Dr. Hoeksel’s leadership in nursing education and policy development related to academic progression in nursing has re-modeled RN-BSN education across the state, resulting in higher quality patient care. Her leadership resulted in highly successful connections between practice and education while increasing access to nationally accredited RN-BSN programs across five Western states. She was honored by the Washington State Nurses Association in 2015 as Nurse Educator of the Year, and recognized for the overall legacy of her contributions through induction into the WSNA Hall of Fame in 2016.

As an Academy of Nursing Education Fellow, Dr. Hoeksel will promote standards of excellence in nursing education that will increase the number of graduates from all types of nursing programs. Fellows serve as important role models and as resources for new educators and for those who aspire to become nurse educators.

Said Dr. Beverly A. Malone, CEO of the National League for Nursing, “We rely on these accomplished individuals as allies in our efforts to prepare the numbers of excellent nurse educators we need. They deserve this public acknowledgement and the gratitude of all who are eager to elevate the status of our profession.”

Dr. Hoeksel is one of 14 nurse educators selected for the 11th class of Fellows.

For more information on the WSU College of Nursing, visit nursing.wsu.edu.

For more information on the National League for Nursing, visit www.nln.org.

Recent PhD grad Ruth Bryant recognized for research on pressure ulcers

A portrait of Ruth Bryant in her commencement robes.
A portrait of Ruth Bryant in her commencement robes.
Ruth Bryant at WSU College of Nursing commencement, May 5, 2017.

 

Ruth Bryant, who received her PhD from the WSU College of Nursing earlier this month, is the first person to receive a new award from the Western Institute of Nursing Gerontological Special Interest Group.

Bryant was recognized for Best Student Presentation at the recent WIN conference in Denver for her research abstract, “Comorbid Conditions Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Pressure Ulcers.”

“Getting an award at WIN was really a surprise,” Bryant said recently.

The longtime nurse has devoted much of her career to wound healing and wound care, co-founding an accredited online program for nurses seeking advanced certification in wound, ostomy and continence care.

She wanted to pursue her doctorate and chose WSU College of Nursing because of its hybrid model, combining four weeks of in-person course work with online and distance-learning.   » More …