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Janessa Graves
Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care

Families of rural children with mild head injuries pay more for medical care and get less of it, a Washington State University analysis has found.

Janessa M. Graves, an assistant professor of nursing at WSU Spokane, analyzed data on more than 380,000 children with mild traumatic brain injuries, which usually involve concussions. They account for almost all types of traumatic brain injury, moderate and severe being the other two. On the whole, traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents in the United States.

Patients with mild traumatic brain injury are hospitalized less frequently and often get treated … » More …

teen looking at her phone in bed
Start with phones, not pills, in tackling teenage insomnia

A growing number of teenagers in Anne Mason’s psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner practice are asking for prescriptions to get sleep medications. 

fierce-looking chihuahua on an exam table
WSU students, people and pets all helped by wellness clinic

Dogs, cats and their people cycled through the second Healthy People + Healthy Pets clinic at Washington State University Health Sciences last week, all getting free vaccinations, screenings and simple treatments from WSU nursing and veterinary medicine students. 

Janet Katz
Tool will measure cultural sensitivity from patient’s point of view

The United States is getting more diverse, and that’s a challenge for health care providers, said Professor Janet Katz of the Washington State University College of Nursing.

Group of four people holding a plaque
Grant will help nursing students build skills in end-of-life care

As a young oncology nurse, Andra Davis treated patients who were approaching death. She didn’t shrink from that service, but came away feeling “rewarded and enriched” by being present at that stage of her patients’ lives. 

Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel
Dean’s Letter: “We are building something that matters”

What an exciting time this is for the College of Nursing! As we begin our 50th anniversary celebrations, I would like to take a minute for reflection. 

portrait
Lois James honored as a YWCA Woman of Achievement

Lois James, an assistant professor in the Washington State University College of Nursing, was honored on Oct. 4 as a Woman of Achievement by the YWCA of Spokane.

Connie Nguyen-Truong honored by cancer education group

Connie Nguyen-Truong, an assistant professor at the Washington State University College of Nursing in Vancouver, and community partners Chiao-Yun Hsiao and Victoria Demchak, will be awarded the R. Davilene Carter Presidential Prize for best manuscript from the American Association for Cancer Education at the group’s annual meeting next month. 

portrait of three people
Study looks at transitions from opioid use to addiction, treatment

How do people with chronic pain move from appropriate use of opioids to addiction? And what prompts them to seek addiction treatment? As the United States grapples with rising opioid addiction and overdose death rates, the answers to those questions are critical. Yet they’re not well understood. 

garbage can full of medical waste
Podcast targets nurses and the environment

Beth Schenk has always been interested in the natural world, and that didn’t change when she became a nurse.

Washington State University