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Declining number of rural pharmacies in Washington ‘a worrisome trend’

A small-town pharmacist dispenses medication, of course. But they might also provide clinical services like immunizations and blood pressure screenings; consult on health issues; or even act as a de facto benefits or case manager for customers.

Study: Having a quiet place for work breaks helps combat fatigue

Health-care workers who have a quiet place to rest on their work breaks reported being significantly less sleepy than those who didn’t have that access, according to new research led by Marian Wilson, Ph.D., of the Washington State University College of Nursing.

Lois James
Federal study of nurses’ work shifts led by WSU College of Nursing scientist

A researcher at the Washington State University College of Nursing will lead a $1 million, federally-funded study on nurses’ work shifts that could influence policy nationally.

exterior shot, Mayo Clinic
WSU College of Nursing Ph.D. student named King Hussein Scholar at Mayo Clinic

A Washington State University College of Nursing Ph.D. student has been named a King Hussein Scholar for nursing research at the Mayo Clinic. 

Tullamora Diede standing behind a lectern
Research spotlight: Nurses are essential, yet they struggle within the health care system

Research spotlight: Tullamora Diede, “Professional identity in the lived experience of hospital nurses”

Nurses are the largest segment of the health-care workforce, and nursing is the most-trusted profession in America, according to annual polls. Yet studies have found that nurses feel disrespected and powerless in their profession, and nearly a third leave their job within the first year. 

News release: College of Nursing faculty part of group landing $1.8 million for “smart home” research

SPOKANE, Wash. – An interprofessional team of scientists from Washington State University has landed a $1.77 million grant to research how “smart home” technology can monitor the health and safety of senior citizens from afar.

Community fitness program helped overweight teens in Coeur d’Alene

Image of two feet in running shoes.

Five years ago, researchers in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, wanted to test whether overweight teenagers would be receptive to a community-based fitness program that included exercise, goal-setting, and nutrition coaching.

Photo of Mason Burley
Research spotlight: Predicting hospitalization for mental illness could aid early intervention

Research Spotlight: Mason Burley, “Evaluating Risk for Psychiatric Re-Hospitalization: a Recurrent Event History Analysis” (Individual Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program)

The treatment of people with serious mental illness has changed dramatically over the last 50 years, from long-term institutionalization to community-based care. But the community-care system is lacking, and some people with serious mental illness are repeatedly hospitalized, released and re-admitted, a costly and disruptive cycle.

Washington State University doctoral student Mason Burley wanted to identify consistent and reliable factors associated with psychiatric re-hospitalization to help guide public policy and treatment options.

Photo of Teresa Bigand gesturing to her research poster
Research Spotlight: Being overweight significantly increases odds of chronic pain

Research spotlight: Teresa Bigand, “Examining Risk for Overweight Status Among Adults with Chronic Pain

Doctoral student Teresa Bigand’s research concludes that being overweight significantly increases an adult’s odds of suffering chronic pain. In fact, the higher a person’s body mass index (BMI), the greater their likelihood of having multiple chronic pain conditions, she says.

So which comes first, the pain or the weight?

“One study seems to suggest that the weight comes first,” she said. “That’s more exciting for me, because if we can get people to get their weight under control, we can control two different disease processes at once.”

Bigand, who entered the … » More …

Poverty a frequent barrier to achieving health goals, research found

Older people with multiple chronic conditions often face barriers that aren’t considered in setting goals for better health, a WSU College of Nursing undergraduate student found.

Mariah Petersen, who’ll graduate in May with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, will present her findings at the Showcase for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (SURCA) on Monday.

Petersen found that poverty was a common “contextual” barrier to achieving health goals. For example, 23.8 percent of patients whose goal was to lose weight cited poverty as a reason they … » More …

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