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Italian nurse visits WSU to explore the power of touch in healthcare

An internet discovery led an Italian nurse to the Washington State University College of Nursing this summer. 

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Study looks at transitions from opioid use to addiction, treatment

How do people with chronic pain move from appropriate use of opioids to addiction? And what prompts them to seek addiction treatment? As the United States grapples with rising opioid addiction and overdose death rates, the answers to those questions are critical. Yet they’re not well understood. 

Study: Having a quiet place for work breaks helps combat fatigue

Health-care workers who have a quiet place to rest on their work breaks reported being significantly less sleepy than those who didn’t have that access, according to new research led by Marian Wilson, Ph.D., of the Washington State University College of Nursing.

Marian Wilson, Ph.D., assistant professor at the WSU College of Nursing, has a new study examining the relationship between marijuana use among opioid addiction patients.
Marijuana use may not aid patients in opioid addiction treatment

Many patients who are being treated for opioid addiction in a medication-assisted treatment clinic use marijuana to help manage their pain and mood symptoms.

Study: 12-hour night shift can affect a nurse’s performance

Working a 12-hour night shift affects a nurse’s performance more than working a 12-hour day shift does, according to a recent study by Marian Wilson, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the WSU College of Nursing.

Community fitness program helped overweight teens in Coeur d’Alene

Image of two feet in running shoes.

Five years ago, researchers in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, wanted to test whether overweight teenagers would be receptive to a community-based fitness program that included exercise, goal-setting, and nutrition coaching.

Marian Wilson
Women are More Likely to Talk About Pain, Study Finds

Marian Wilson

WSU researchers say new approach reduces pill use

By LeAnn Bjerken – originally published in the Journal of Business
Dr. Marian Wilson, a second-year assistant professor at Washington State University Spokane, found in a study on chronic pain that women seem more open than men to participating in studies and sharing their symptoms.

“To me, it’s a very positive thing, seeing this amount of women who are willing to participate in open discussions of chronic pain,” says Wilson. “At the same time, it makes me worry about the men, as they … » More …

Marian Wilson
Online Management Tools Help Ease Chronic Pain

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Marian WilsonSPOKANE, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found that people can manage chronic pain and reduce their reliance on opioids through an Internet-based program that teaches non-medical alternatives like increased physical activity, thinking more positively and dealing with emotions.

Marian Wilson, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing, tracked 43 people with chronic non-cancer pain as they went through an eight-week course of online tools to manage psychological, social and health issues associated with chronic pain. Compared to a similar-sized control group, the participants reported that they … » More …

No Pain’s a Gain: WSU Researchers are Finding New Ways to Tackle America’s Pain Problems.

by Eric Sorensen – published in Washington State Magazine

The pain wasn’t acute or sharp, more a powerful, throbbing ache focused on the lower back. Ron Weaver was in his early 20s. He was a meat cutter, and at first he thought it was a typical problem for the trade—twisting, working in the cold, “lifting too heavy.” He tried muscle relaxants. He had physical therapy, massage therapy, and 222’s, a combination of codeine, caffeine, and aspirin, and went about his life.

Over time, it took longer to loosen up in the morning. The pain worsened at night. Things got downright scary when his heart … » More …

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