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Janessa Graves
Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care

Families of rural children with mild head injuries pay more for medical care and get less of it, a Washington State University analysis has found.

Janessa M. Graves, an assistant professor of nursing at WSU Spokane, analyzed data on more than 380,000 children with mild traumatic brain injuries, which usually involve concussions. They account for almost all types of traumatic brain injury, moderate and severe being the other two. On the whole, traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents in the United States.

Patients with mild traumatic brain injury are hospitalized less frequently and often get treated … » More …

Declining number of rural pharmacies in Washington ‘a worrisome trend’

A small-town pharmacist dispenses medication, of course. But they might also provide clinical services like immunizations and blood pressure screenings; consult on health issues; or even act as a de facto benefits or case manager for customers.

Janessa Graves
Head blows in contact sports not child’s play

 

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – Hoping to address concussion concerns and declining participation, the youth arm of the NFL in September will roll out a pilot program that alters how football is played by its youngest athletes. USA Football aims to reduce the head-banging force of the game by testing a new format called modified tackle.

Keeping a close eye on the change is Janessa Graves, assistant professor at Washington State University’s College of Nursing and a pediatric injury researcher.

“Knowing that young athletes’ developing brains make them more susceptible to concussion injuries, it only makes sense that we … » More …

Concussion a Disproportionate Healthcare Cost to Society

Janessa GravesSPOKANE, Wash. – Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in children are costly to individuals and society. A new study shows that, though moderate and severe TBI cost more for the individuals involved, there are so many more cases of mild TBI, such as concussions, that their cost to the general population is much higher.

The study is important because it provides evidence that mild TBI prevention strategies could lead to significant cost savings, said lead author Janessa Graves, assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Washington State University, who did the research with the University … » More …

Washington State University