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Roles & Responsibilities

Roles & Responsibilities

  • Orient the student to the clinical site and staff
  • Discuss clinical learning objectives and then create a “roadmap” to structure the clinical experience.  These objectives should be based on student identified learning needs and input from the preceptor coupled with clinical practicum objectives.
  • Promote a positive learning environment that encourages self-directed inquiry, development of critical analysis skills and allows for professional reflection and role development.
  • Validate clinical findings and data reported by the student. Review documentation in the medical record as required.
  • When time and space allow, directly observe the student interacting with patients.  This can help students to refine history taking and physical examination skills and provide real-time feedback to reinforce learning.
  • Assist students in developing differential diagnoses as well as management options.  Offer feedback that advances learning and give “homework” assignments when warranted.
  • Observe the student over the course of their clinical rotation taking note of whether there is consistent improvement in history taking, physical exam skills, critical reasoning, diagnostic thinking, and development of management options.  When appropriate, also review a student’s documentation skills and offer feedback where appropriate.
  • Communicate with clinical faculty or clinical evaluator regarding a student’s progress.  Advise faculty if there is concern that a student is not progressing as expected or deviates from expected professional behavior.
  • Complete and submit student evaluation at the completion of the rotation.

Kathryn Brault, a Family Nurse Practitioner in the Tri-Cities, is a preceptor for the WSU College of Nursing. She precepts students at her specialty clinic for diabetes patients in Richland, and at Grace Clinic, which provides free health care to people in need. Why does she do it?

“I love what I do, and I want other people to see how rewarding it can be.”

Washington State University