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HPA Professor Jae Kennedy
Dr. Jae Kennedy named president-elect of disability research organization

A decades-long interest in issues relating to disability has taken Dr. Jae Kennedy to a leadership position with NARRTC, an organization that advocates for increasing the quality and rigor of applied disability research. Kennedy, professor and chair of the WSU College of Nursing’s Health Policy & Administration program, was named president-elect of the organization at its annual conference last week.

NARRTC is made up of current and former grantees of the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation. The federal agency funds projects to generate new knowledge on disability and rehabilitation and to encourage the adoption and use of that work. Projects … » More …

Jae Kennedy
WSU Health Policy and Administration Program Update

Department Chair Jae Kennedy provides an update on the Health Policy program, new research and grant work.

Jae Kennedy
Study to Examine Affordable Care Act, Those with Disabilities

By Eric Sorensen, WSU

A Washington State University researcher will lead a $2.5 million examination of the federal Affordable Care Act’s impact on what may be the largest group in need of its services: people with disabilities.

 

Jae Kennedy“Their service needs are different and their health needs are more intensive,” said Jae Kennedy, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Administration, College of Nursing, WSU Spokane. “There are a lot of reasons why this is an important population to study and make sure that the legislation is living up to its promise.”

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No Pain’s a Gain: WSU Researchers are Finding New Ways to Tackle America’s Pain Problems.

by Eric Sorensen – published in Washington State Magazine

The pain wasn’t acute or sharp, more a powerful, throbbing ache focused on the lower back. Ron Weaver was in his early 20s. He was a meat cutter, and at first he thought it was a typical problem for the trade—twisting, working in the cold, “lifting too heavy.” He tried muscle relaxants. He had physical therapy, massage therapy, and 222’s, a combination of codeine, caffeine, and aspirin, and went about his life.

Over time, it took longer to loosen up in the morning. The pain worsened at night. Things got downright scary when his heart … » More …

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