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Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – December 2016

Research News

New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain

Marian Wilson
By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane
SPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options.

“Physicians are being pressured to stop prescribing so many opioids,” said Marian Wilson, assistant professor in the WSU College of Nursing and lead investigator on the study. New prescription guidelines issued this year by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend providers limit the use of opioids in patients with chronic pain, she said.

“It’s not fair to start cutting longtime opioid users off of their medications without giving them some effective alternatives,” she said.

The relationship between sleep and pain has not been adequately studied, she said: “There’s a small body of literature that suggests that pain and sleep correlate – bad sleep goes with bad pain – but we don’t know for sure which comes first. ‘Is my pain worse because I’ve slept poorly, or was my pain so bad that I couldn’t sleep?’” » continue reading

New police training draws from science of deadly force

Lois James

By Linda Weiford, WSU News
A portable use-of-force simulator aimed at launching a new era in police training is being rolled out by Washington State University.

Called the Counter Bias Training Simulation, or CBTsim, it is the only simulation technology to use interactive video scenarios derived from extensive research of actual police-involved shootings over 30 years in the U.S.

Developed by researchers at WSU’s Simulated Hazardous Operational Tasks Laboratory in Spokane, the device is being offered as a science-driven training tool at a time when shootings involving police are under intense public scrutiny. » continue reading

WSU Health Sciences Update: College of Nursing Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel

Dr.-Joyce-Griffin-Sobel

WSU College of Nursing Dean Griffin-Sobel discusses simulation, nursing research, interprofessional education and collaboration, and her plans for the future of the college.

» watch video


What’s New in Grants?

Awarded

Four new awards were received by College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators in the month of November, totaling $273,001 in funding:

Demetrius Abshire, Janessa Graves, Mary Roberts, Janet Katz, Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Cindy Corbett.  Support Systems in Accelerated Nursing Programs: Gender-Based Perspectives and Impact on Academic Outcomes. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: New Careers in Nursing program

PI: Marian Wilson, Co-I: Hans Van Dongen. Hypnosis and Meditation for Pain Management in Veterans, Efficacy and Mechanisms.

PI: Hang Liu, Co-Is: Subhanshu Gupta, Martin Schiavenato. Self-Weighing, Self-Powered, Smart Sensing Textile.

PI: Sterling McPherson, Co-Is: Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, John Roll. Clinical Trials Network: Pacific Northwest Node.

First year PhD student Teresa Bigand has been awarded the Nursing Economics Foundation Scholarship in the amount of $5,000, as well as the Dorothy Detlor Graduate Fellowship in Nursing Education Scholarship in the amount of $2,710 toward her program of study.

Other Good News from our Alumni

Molly Altman received the Clinical Scholarship from Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) for her project: Preserving Self: Medication-Taking Practices and Preferences of Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions.

Gail Salvatierra received the Health Policy Systems Scholarship from Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) for her project: Rapid Response Teams: Is it Time to Reframe the Questions of Rapid Response Team Measurement?

Submitted

The College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators, in either the PI role or Co-I role, submitted ten new proposals in November, totaling $7,113,865 in requested funds:

PI: Michael McDonell, Co-Is: Naomi Chaytor, Sterling McPherson, Sean Murphy, John Roll. Novel ETG Based Contingency Management for Alcohol in the Severely Mentally Ill.  submitted to NIH/NIAAA

PI: Tracy Skaer, Co-Is: Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Michael McDonell. Mindfulness-based Practices and Multiple Family Groups in Chronic Pain Patients With a High Risk of Opioid Misuse.  submitted to NIH/NCCIH

PI: Janet Katz. Nursing Pathways: Community Alliance for Health. submitted to Health Resources and Administration (HRSA)

PI: Patricia Butterfield. Intervention to Improve Safety/Health/and Well-being in Healthcare: Patient Handling. submitted as a subcontract to Oregon Heath & Science University (OHSU) who submitted to NIH/NIOSH

PI: Lori Bailey. Washington State University Nurse Faculty Loan Program 2017. submitted to Health Resources and Administration (HRSA)

PI: Kimberly McKeirnan, Co-Is: Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Linda Maclean, Lisa Woodard. Building the Prototype of a Regional System that Will Increase Access to Quality Patient Care through Medication Optimization. submitted to Empire Health Foundation

PI: Hang Liu, Co-Is: Subhanshu Gupta, Martin Schiavenato. Self-Weighing, Self-Powered, Smart Sensing Textile. submitted to WSU Gap Fund

PI: Demetrius Abshire, Co-I: Kenn Daratha. A Multilevel Examination of Urban-Rural Differences in Treatment and Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial Infarction.  submitted to Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI)

PI: Janessa Graves. Harnessing Technology to Improve Health information and Access for Persons with Limited English Proficiency.  submitted as a subcontract with the University of Washington who submitted to NIH/NLM

PI: Tullamora Diede. Professional Identity in the Lived Experience of Hospital Nurses. submitted to Northwest Center for Occupational Heath & Safety

Research Spotlight

The Value of Phenomenology in the Spectrum of Nursing Research

Billie Severtsen
Billie M. Severtsen

Nov. 28, 2016

Why is this methodology important as one component in the “stable” of nursing research? The answer lies in the idea of what it means to think deeply about something. Thinking deeply means pondering, mulling over and allowing what at first may be hidden to show itself. Although we all do this as we live our lives, relatively few of us think of it as a deliberate act. Moreover, the words – mull over, ponder, allowing – sound old fashioned and out of date when one considers the amazing discoveries that technological advances have brought us. Yet, because both health care and nursing research deal with people, we should remember that people are not merely numbers. People have embodied intelligence (the intelligence of their bodies), background meaning in their lives (fore structure), they possess a hierarchy of concern and they have the context of the situation in which they find themselves.

With this complex idea of “people” as a beginning premise, it becomes clear that it is important to balance the hard science of quantitative research with an authentic voice of the people being studied. The process of doing this is not unlike what happens when we, in health care, do as we assess and treat a patient. We gather an extensive record of scientific facts about the patient – – lab values, physical exam, medical and social history, medication record, etc. A good clinician also takes time to talk with the patient to assess the patient’s own narrative. The clinician does this because, in the act of showing concern for the patient by paying attention to their story, something else shows up. That “something else” is what represents “true” or “authentic” for the patient. True, in this context does not refer to a fixed, unmovable true, but rather true as a relative concept showing up for the patient in relationship to the topic being studied.

This example of clinician and patient can be compared to nursing research. We need quantitative data to study and advance the profession of nursing. We also need the authentic voice of the individuals being studied to describe truth as it shows up for them. Only in this way do we obtain a more complete picture of the “phenomenon” or the thing being studied.

Phenomenology allows us to open ourselves to the mystery of what is authentic for the people we study. In the deliberate act of allowing this authenticity to show itself, we can contribute meaningfully to the research topics that are important in advancing nursing science.

Research FYI

There have been some updates and changes from our Washington State University Office of Research and Development (ORSO).

  • There is a new version of the Budget Workbook and it has been uploaded to the ORSO Guidelines page.  Please be sure to use this latest version.
  • On budget spreadsheets, if you have the budgets broken out on more than one tab, each tab needs to be certified.
  • There will soon be no more ex post facto eREX submissions. ORSO is still working on the process, but manual approval will be required for any proposal submitted late (less than 2 business days). A written explanation as to why the submission is late will be required, and each approver will have to verify they have read the explanation and approve the submission. If the approvals aren’t going to be completed by the deadline, it will take a waiver from Dan Nordquist to submit. ORSO expects the new eREX prototype to be out in March, and finalized by June.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has published their updated Rural America at a Glance, 2016 Edition.  This report highlights the most recent indicators of social and economic conditions in rural areas, focusing on the U.S. rural economy, including employment, population, poverty, and income trends.

University of Utah, College of nursing offers an online resource for Journal Writing.  Writing for Professional Journals is open to the public and is licensed under Creative Commons. Patricia Gonce Morton, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Utah College of Nursing Dean, authored the content as part of a grant provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) while participating in the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow program.

Looking for a good Ted Talk?  Exploring the problem of high school drop outs, Sir Ken Robinson offers a 19 minute talk entitled How to Escape Education’s Death Valley.

Having trouble balancing it all?  Guardian’s Higher Education Network offers a piece, Academia is now incompatible with family life, thanks to casual contracts.  In it, Anonymous Academic, shares the struggles of lack of job security on academic tracks, balancing home and work and the pressure to achieve.  Similarly, nature completed an online poll where almost two thirds of respondents stated they have considered quitting research.  In Hard work, little reward: Nature readers reveal working hours and research challenges, researchers cite “the fight for funding” (44%) as the largest challenge and “lack of work-life balance” a distant second (19%).

The Surgeon General has released Facing Addiction in America, a report on alcohol, drugs and health.  They address the scope of the problem and the barriers to care among other issues.

Researchers have uncovered a surprising possible trigger for some preterm births: calcium buildup in the womb. Calciprotein particles as potential etiologic agents of idiopathic preterm birth is just the beginning of this promising work that will hopefully lead to larger samples to validate their findings.

In times of political uncertainty, the Scientist offers direction for researchers who are worrying about the future of NIH funding.  In Opinion: Toot Your Horn, Jordan Gaines Lewis provides very specific ways for individuals to reach out to policy makers.

Can Poverty Lead to Mental Illness?  NPR’s Emily Sohn addresses this emerging phenomenon and the researchers that are exploring it.

The American Association of Nurse Practitioners shared the following infographic during Nurse Practitioner’s Week.

Research – Spotlight


Julie Postma recently attended Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) annual meeting held in Washington DC.  PCORI awards focus on stakeholder investment and Julie attended the conference with her community partners from the Puget Sound Asthma Coalition and Clean Air for Kids program at the Tacoma Pierce County Health Department.  Three Washington State University College of Nursing DNP students, Brittany Collier, Madaline Goldmann and Amy Ryll, received scholarships to attend the meeting.


Kevin McCain and RaKisha McCain from the Puget Sound Asthma Coalition, Judy Olsen, from Clean Air for Kids program at the Tacoma Pierce County Health Department and Julie Postma.

Washington State University, College of Nursing DNP students Brittany Collier, Madaline Goldmann, Amy Ryll, and Julie Postma


Research – Just for Fun

Drawn to Drink: A Double-Blind Randomized Cross-Over Trial of the Effects of Magnets on the Taste of Cheap Red Wine,” G. James Rubin, Gareth Hahn, Edward Allberry, Ross Innes, and Simon Wessely, Journal of Wine Research, vol. 16, no. 1, 2005, pp. 65-69., tested magnetized red wine to see if the taste was improved.  Read the full article to see what they discovered.

Research Funnies

Research Puzzle

Recent Publications

Dekker, L. (2016). Cultural safety and critical race theory: Educational frameworks to promote reflective nursing practice. In H. Brown, & R. Sawyer, Forms of practitioner reflexivity: Critical professional conversations for change in a new age. Palgrave Macmillan.

Sawyer, R. D., Dekker, L., & Rasmor, M. (2016). In search of an artistic curriculum identity. In R. D. Sawyer, & J. Norris, Book I-Dialogic interdisciplinary self-study through the practice of duoethnography Palgrave Macmillan.

James, L., James, S., Vila, B. Testing the Impact of Citizen Characteristics and Demeanor on Police Officer Behavior in Potentially Violent Encounters. Policing: an International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, (in press).

Katz, J., Vandermause, R., McPherson, S., & Barbosa-Leiker, C. (2016). A demonstration of mixed-methods research in the health sciences. Nurse Researcher, 24(2), 24-29.

Klein, T., Graves, J., & Graham, J. (2016, in press). Driving following adolescent concussion: Advice by nurse  practitioners in absence of standardized recommendations. Journal of Pediatric Health Care.

Fitzgerald, C., Purath, J.,  Van Son, C., Duvall, D., Eddy, L. (2016). A Course-Based Approach to the DNP Project: Supporting Student Growth from Concept to Completion. Nurse Educator. Accepted for publication Nurse Educator.

Rasmor, M. (2016). Digital storytelling in nurse practitioner education: a beginning of reflective clinical practice. In H. Brown, & R. Sawyer, Forms of practitioner reflexivity: Critical professional conversations for change in a new age. Palgrave Macmillan.

Kooienga, S., & Rasmor., M. (2016) Shoulder pain assessment for the occupational health nurse. Workplace Health and Safety Journal, Volume 64, Number 10, p. 448-452.

Schiavenato, M., & Holsti, L. (2017). Defining Procedural Distress in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit and What Can Be Done about It. Neonatal Network, 36(1).

Hu, H., Gupta, S., & Schiavenato, M. (in press). A Near Zero Power CMOS Relaxation Oscillator for Biomedical Applications with 19.1ppm/°C Temperature Coefficient. IEEE Sensors 2016 Conference Proceedings.

Marian Wilson, Vicki Gettel, Judith Walsh, and Sunny Esquenazi (2016) Caring Compassionately for Hospitalized Patients: Can Nurse-Delivered Massage Address Compassion Fatigue?. International Journal for Human Caring: 2016, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 146-154.

Recent Presentations

Abshire, D.A., Lennie, T.A., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Burduli, E., & Moser, D.K. (2016, November). Depressive symptoms, anxiety, and perceived social support do not predict weight change in overweight and obese rural adults with low education attainment. Poster presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, New Orleans, LA.

Barron, S.G. (2016, November).  Using Feedback as a Life Preserver (Instead of a Sword).  Presented at the Acute Care Education Annual Leadership Summit, Vancouver, WA.

Mackay-Neorr, C. L. & Nogueras, D. (2016, November).  Our struggle is our strength: Cultivating nursing peer mentors for community leadership.  Poster session presented at the Annual American Association of Colleges of Nursing Baccalaureate Education Conference, Anaheim, CA.

Postma, J. & McCain, RaKisha. (2016). Invited speaker. “Pre-engagement in patient-centered outcomes research: Lessons from the field.” Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s annual meeting, Washington D.C. 11/19/16.

Schiavenato, M. Innovation in Nursing.  [Keynote Speaker]. Man in Nursing Conference. November 11, 2016; Garden Grove, CA.

Brody, A., Gillespie, G., Palazzo, S., Schiavenato, M., Pesut, D. Diversity Dynamics: Lessons Learned from the Experience of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars. [Podium]. Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research.  September 15, 2016; Washington, DC

Wilson, M., & Riedy, S. (November 2016). Survey of sleep heath in a community hospital. Guest speaker. Pullman Regional Hospital, Pullman, WA.

Wilson, M., Orr, M., Sherazi, N., & Finlay, M. (September 2016). Online pain self-management for adults in opioid addiction treatment. Guest speaker. Spokane Treatment Solutions, Spokane Valley, WA.

Wilson, M., & Mason, A. (November 2016) Engaging adults with chronic illness in online depressive symptom management. Washington State University College of Nursing, Research First Friday Series, Spokane, WA

Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they share research that shows there is no safe level of smoking.  Less than one cigarette per day over a lifetime caused 64 percent higher risk of earlier death.

The National Institute of Nursing Research “News and Notes” – This month they roll out Stories of Discovery.  This webpage spotlights programs of research from NINR-funded institutions around the country.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH. This month they share NIH request for public Input on Data Sharing and Data Management.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they released a new analysis of the nation’s behavioral health workforce.  The report, entitled National Projections of Supply and Demand for Selected Behavioral Health Practitioners:  2013-2025, provides estimates for the supply and demand of nine separate behavioral health practitioner disciplines.  This brief, along with other workforce information, is available on HRSA’s National Center for Health Workforce Analysis website.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. This month they share Hallucinogenic drug psilocybin eases existential anxiety in people with life-threatening cancer, where researchers found people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of “magic mushrooms”.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: random, accuracy, framework, inductive, construct.   …future income

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – November 2016

Research Office

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review is WSU College of Nursing’s newsletter covering faculty research and efforts to improve health and healthcare through scholarly inquiry and investigation.

What’s New in Grants?

Awarded

Four new awards were received by College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators totaling $643,238 in funding:

Sterling McPherson, John Roll, Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Clinical Trials Network: Pacific Northwest Node, University of Washington.

Martin Schiavenato, Subhanshu Gupta, Developing a Multidimensional Pain Detection Device for Infants: Human Demonstration Phase, M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

Cindy Corbett, Brian Gates, Joshua Neumiller, Preserving Self: Empowering Older Persons Who Take Multiple Medications, Empire Health Foundation.

James (Jae) Kennedy, Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living, Administration for Living.

Submitted

The College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators, in either the PI role or Co-I role, submitted eleven new proposals totaling $8,559,398 in requested funds:

Barbara Richardson, Patricia Butterfield, Tracy Skaer, Social Determinants of Health Case Study, Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR).

Amber Fyfe-Johnson, Dedra Buchwald, Clemma Muller, Risk Factors for Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease and Kidney Disease in American Indian Youth: The Strong Heart Family Study, NIH/NIDDK.

Shannon Panther, Jonathan Coffey, Karen Colorafi, Kimberly McKeirnan, Utilizing Academic Detailing to Improve Pharmacy Personnel Knowledge of ACIP Adult Pneumococcal Immunization Guidelines, NIH/NIGMS.

Diane Cook, Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe, Shelly Fritz, A Clinician-in-the-Loop Smart Home to Support Health Monitoring and Intervention for Chronic Conditions, NIH/NINR.

Denise Smart, Janessa Graves, Tamara Odom-Maryon, Gail Oneal, Exertional Heat Injury Scoring Tool: Mixed Methods Analytic Approach, Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP).

Demetrius Abshire, Janessa Graves, Janet Katz, Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Cindy Corbett, Support Systems in Accelerated Nursing Programs, RWJF/AACN/NCIN.

Julie Postma, Managing Asthma around Puget Sound, University of Washington.

Kawkab Shishani, Tamara Odom-Maryon, John Roll, Sean Murphy, Resistance and Refusal Skill Building in Combination with Contingency Management Waterpipe Smoking, NIH/NIDA.

Sean Murphy, An Economic Evaluation of Depot Naltrexone to Prevent Opioid Relapse among Opioid-Dependent Pre-release Prisoners, NIH/NCI.

Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe, Diane Cook, Bruce Wright, Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Shelly Fritz, Promoting Healthy Brain Aging in Midlife and Identifying Change Mechanisms, NIH/NINR.

Kenn Daratha, PMRC Staff Assignment Agreement, Providence Medical Research Center.


Research FYI

CLICK” IRB Spokane New eIRB System: November 1 the IRB Spokane’s new eIRB system, CLICK, goes online. This will make some changes to the way Nursing will process IRB applications for IRB Spokane. Previously, IRB Spokane forms were first review by our Research Office, then forwarded to the WSU IRB. The WSU IRB would log the application giving it a WSU IRB number, and forward the application to IRB Spokane. With the new CLICK eIRB system, you will be submitting directly to IRB Spokane, and they will be forwarding a copy to WSU—the reverse of the old way.  Our Nursing Research Office still plans to review all IRB applications before they are sent to either Spokane or WSU IRBs. Please send a copy of all your application forms and documents to Kathy Bridwell (bridwell@wsu.edu).  Allow at least a week for this review time when planning for your deadlines.

Rejection is hard and if you are submitting manuscripts, you are exposed to rejection on a pretty regular basis.  Guy Winch shares The Need to Practice Emotional First Aid in his Ted Talk here.

Safe to Sleep has the updated recommendations for safe infant sleep.  The latest AAP recommendations include 19 overall guidelines for reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death. The primary recommendation for reducing the risk of SIDS remains the same: place babies completely on their backs to sleep for all sleep times, naps and at night. Nine of the recommendations relate directly to the infant’s sleep environment.

In a study done by University of Colorado psychiatrist Robert Freedman and colleagues, they studied whether giving the B vitamin choline during pregnancy would enhance brain growth in the developing fetus.  It appeared that choline might steer the infant brain away from a developmental course that predicted mental health problems. The full article can be found here.

Effect of Medicaid Coverage on ED Use — Further Evidence from Oregon’s Experiment found ER use stayed high two years after Medicaid patients gained the health insurance coverage — even as they also increased their visits to doctors’ offices.

A team led by Dr. Mark Olfson of Columbia University Medical Center set out to assess how depression is treated in adults in the U.S. The study was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). They found most people who screened positive for depression were not receiving care and those who were receiving treatment for depression did not screen positive for depression.


Research – Just for Fun

If you are wondering what color to wear on your next blind date, you may want to choose red.  In Red and Romantic Behavior in Men Viewing Women and Red, Rank, and Romance in Women Viewing Men, both men and women showed a preference for individuals wearing red, asking more intimate questions and feeling more physically drawn to them.

funny-research


Research Funnies

comic-greeting-card

no-soup-for-you-comic

 


Research Puzzle

jumble-1116


Recent Publications

Salvatierra, G.G., Bindler, R.C., & Daratha, K. (2016). Rapid response teams: Is it time to reframe the questions of RRT measurement? Journal of Nursing Scholarship. Accepted for publication.

Ball, J., Bindler, R., Cowen, K., & Shaw, M. (2017).  Principles of Pediatric Nursing: Caring for Children, 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ:  Prentice Hall Health.

Dermody, G., Sawyer, P., Kennedy, R., Williams, C., Brown, C.J. (2016). Emergency Department Utilization and Self-Reported Symptoms in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

Dermody, G. (2016). Evidence-based practice in the global community: Building bridges. In H.R. Hall & L.A. Roussel (Eds.), Evidence-based practice an integrative approach to research, administration and practice (357-371). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Graves JM, Klein TA. The impact of patient characteristics on nurse practitioners’ assessment and management of adolescent concussion. Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. In press.

Holliday, C., Wynne, M., Katz, J. R., Ford, C., & Barbosa Leiker, C. (accepted Oct 2016). A CBPR approach to finding community strengths and challenges to prevent youth suicide and substance abuse. Journal of Transcultural Nursing.

Lim, S., Allen, K., Bhutta, Z.,  Dandona, L., Forouzanfar, M.,  Fullman, S., Gething, P., Goldberg, E., Hay, S., …, Shishani, K., & Murray, C. (GBD 2015 SDG Collaborators, 250 author) (2016). Measuring the health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 countries: a baseline analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet. Published online September 21, 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31467-2

Mokdad, A., Forouzanfar, M., Daoud, F,…Shishani, K., … & Murray, C. (GBD 2015 SDG Collaborators, 250 author) (2016). Health in times of uncertainty in the eastern Mediterranean region, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Lancet Global Health, 4 (10), e704–e713. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(16)30168-1

Senger, B.A., Ward, L.D., Barbosa-Leiker, C., & Bindler, R.C. (2016). The parent experience of caring for a child with mitochondrial disease. Journal of Pediatric Nursing 31(1), 32-41.

Senger, B.A., Ward, L.D., Barbosa-Leiker, C., & Bindler, R.C. (2016). Stress and coping of parents caring for a child with mitochondrial disease. Applied Nursing Research 29, 195-201.

Recent Presentations

Colorafi, L. (2016). Do older adults with limited health literacy use the patient portal? Poser Presentation: Health Literacy Annual Research Conference, Bethesda, Maryland.

Fincham, S. J., & Mason, A. M.  (2016, October 6).  Developing a Collaborative Longitudinal Interprofessional Education (IPE) Program Using Standardized Patients.  Poster Presentation at the DNP National Conference, Baltimore, MD.

James, L. (October 2016). Tired Cops: The Impact of Police Fatigue on Routine Encounters. National Institute of Justice (NIJ) “Your Brain on Stress” Panel (panelist by invitation) at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) 2016 annual conference. San Diego, CA.

James, L. (September 2016). The Impact of Implicit Bias vs. Counter Bias on Police Decisions to Shoot. Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) Trending Issues in Policing Summit. Glenco, GA.

WSU College of Nursing: Katz, J., Holliday, C., & Barbosa-Leiker WSU; Spokane Tribe Community: Wynne, M., Ford, C.,.Wynecoop, W., Spencer, P., Numkena, N., Stensgar, J., Evans, C. & Wynecoop, Z. (2016) Ta hec čmiš qn mist I Will Never Give Up: Pilot Project to Prevent Substance Use and Suicide Using the Gathering of Native American Curriculum. International.

Murphy, S.M., Polsky, D. (10/14/2016). Economic Evaluations of Opioid Use Disorder Interventions: A Systematic Review. Addiction Health Services Research Conference, Seattle

Murphy, S.M., Polsky, D., Lee, J.D., Friedmann, P., Kinlock, T., Nunes, E., Hoskinson, R., Wilson, D., McDonald, R., Gordon, M., Fishman, M., Boney, T., Chen, D., Gourevitch, M., Rotrosen, J. & O’Brien, C. (10/14/2016). Cost-Effectiveness of Depot Naltrexone to Prevent Relapse Among Criminal-Justice-Involved Persons with a History of Opioid Use Disorder: Final Results. Addiction Health Services Research Conference, Seattle

Postma, J. (2016). Invited speaker. “Pre-engagement in patient-centered outcomes research: Lessons from the field.” Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s annual meeting, Washington D.C. 11/19/16.

Randall, L.L. (Nez Perce), Katz, J., Doutrich, D. L., Holliday, C., & Paul, R.L (Nez Perce). (2016, June).  Medicine Wheel, Indigenous Methods/Cultural Safety. My Story, Your Story, Our Story: Grief and Loss of a Child in a Tribal Community. Tribal Research Models, 26th Native Health Research Conference, Cherokee, NC.

Shishani, K. (Invited Speaker). Waterpipe tobacco globalization and health consequences, NIDA International Forum, Palm Springs, CA, June 2016

Other Scholarly Accomplishments

J. Katz NIH grant review. Native American Centers for Health, Health Disparities and Equity Promotion Study Section (HDEP) Healthcare Delivery and Methodologies, National Institutes of Health.

J. Katz NIH grant review. Collaborative Hubs to Reduce the Burden of Suicide among American Indian and Alaska Native Youth (U19), National Institute of Mental Health/National Institutes of Health.

Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they share results from an NIH study investigating the properties of cannabis and how they produce the effects.

The National Institute of Nursing Research “News and Notes” – This month they share information from ClinicalTrials.gov series: three live webinars to provide information about the final rule for Clinical Trials Registration and Results Information Submission.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH. This month they explore application of the Relative Citation Ration as a measure of grant productivity.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they share HHS’s awards of $2.3 billion in grants to help Americans access HIV/AIDS care and medications.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. This month they share one of the most detailed genomic studies of any ecosystem to date, revealing stunning microbial diversity discovered underground.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: analysis, question, theory, chi-square, covariate. …quality “from” quantity

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – October 2016

Research Office

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review is WSU College of Nursing’s newsletter covering faculty research and efforts to improve health and healthcare through scholarly inquiry and investigation.

What’s New in Grants?

The College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators, in either the PI role or Co-I role, submitted seven new proposals in September, totaling $897,335 in requested funds:

PI: Julie Postma. The Impact of Electronic Self-Management Tools on Caregiver Portal Usage and Child Asthma Outcomes. MultiCare Institute for Research & Innovation. $39,906.

PI: Stephen James, Co-I: Lois James. Using Interval-Level Police Performance Metrics to Test the Effectiveness of Seattle Police Department’s Early Intervention System. Seattle Police Department. $100,000.

PI: Marian Wilson. EMPOWER. University of Cincinnati. $119,858.

PI: Sean Murphy. An Economic Evaluation of Long-Acting Naltrexone for Pre-Release Prisoners: A Randomized Trial of Mobile Treatment. Friends Research Institute. $356,421.

PI: Martin Schiavenato, Co-Is: Subhanshu Gupta and Hang Liu. Self-Weighing, Self-Powered, Smart Sensing Textile. WSU Office of Commercialization. $49,906.

PI: Linda Eddy. Cost Center: Juvenile Probation. Pierce County, WA. $14,960.

PI: Sterling McPherson, Co-Is: Matt Layton, Barb Richardson. A Shared Decision Making Tool to Prevent Substance Abuse. Ringful Health. $216,284.

Congratulations!

Three new awards were received by College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators in the month of September, totaling $926,675 in funding:

PI: Mike McDonell, Co-I: Sean Murphy. First Episode Psychosis Evaluation. WA DSHS. $166,012.

PI: Sterling McPherson, Co-Is: Jo Ann Dotson, Matt Layton, Michele Shaw. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) Reference and Decision Support Tool. Ringful Health. $40,000.

PI: Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe, Co-Is: Diane Cook, Chris Hundhausen, Catherine Van Son. Providing Support in Real-time with Smart Technologies to Improve Quality of Life. DoD/Army. $720,663.


Research Spotlight

Strong Men, Strong Communities: Reducing diabetes risk factors among American Indian Men

Ka’imi Sinclair

American Indian (AI) males experience more profound health disparities than their counterparts in all other U.S. racial and ethnic groups. Compared to white men, AI men are more likely to be obese (39% vs. 25%) and physically inactive (54% vs. 45%). Still worse, AI men have the highest age-adjusted prevalence of type 2 diabetes (~18%) among U.S. men, while non-Hispanic White men have the lowest (~7%). In recent decades, AIs have experienced a disproportionate increase in diabetes-related complications and mortality compared to all other groups, such that age-adjusted diabetes death rates in AI men are now almost twice those in white men.

Several large randomized, controlled trials in non-AIs confirm that type 2 diabetes mellitus can be prevented or delayed by interventions that promote weight loss and healthy lifestyles, but little empirical data exist on interventions to prevent diabetes in AI men. In the Diabetes Prevention Program, only 55 out of 3,234 participants were AI men. The non-randomized, clinic-based Special Diabetes Program for Indians-Demonstration Project (SDPI-DP) – the only large national evaluation of a comprehensive diabetes prevention program tailored to AIs – enrolled 2,553 AI participants, but just 25% were men. Full participation in all 16 sessions was associated with lower annual incidence of diabetes (3.5% vs. 7.5%, p < 0.001), yet over one-fourth of male participants dropped out before reaching that critical threshold.

Many explanations have been posited for the low participation rates among men of all races in lifestyle interventions and diabetes risk reduction programs. Recruiting AI men in clinic-based programs is difficult because they tend to seek clinical care less often than women and generally present with more advanced disease. AI men’s perceptions of normative health behaviors and gender roles may also discourage participation.

Dr. Ka`imi Sinclair from the College of Nursing and the Initiative for Research and Education to Advance Community Health (IREACH) has been awarded two grants from the National Institutes of Health to work with American Indian men in four sites to develop and evaluate a community-based, culturally appropriate approach for AI men that targets modifiable diabetes risk factors. It uses methods adapted from successful, non-clinic based programs for other high-risk minority populations to address healthy diet and physical activity, and it incorporates elements of the DPP and SDPI-DP. The adaptations include the use of a “men’s group” format to promote traditional Native lifestyles relevant to diabetes prevention, such as fishing, horsemanship, drumming, and Native games, and a traditional Native diet emphasizing vegetables, fruits, and lean animal proteins such as fish and bison. Culturally tailored groups for indigenous men are increasingly accepted as a useful, cost-effective strategy to improve men’s health, but their impact on health outcomes has not been rigorously examined. Our study will inform the design and implementation of culturally-informed, community-based lifestyle interventions for diabetes prevention in AI men in our partner communities and elsewhere, as well as in men of other minority groups who experience a heavy burden of diabetes.


Research FYI

If you are submitting an NIH application please be sure to know the requirements.  Here is one area to familiarize yourself: Hyperlinks and URLs (most applicable to biosketches)

  • Hyperlinks and URLs are only allowed when specifically noted in funding opportunity announcement (FOA) and form field instructions (e.g. , biosketches, publication lists). It is highly unusual for a FOA to allow links in Specific Aims, Research Strategy and other page-limited attachments.
  • Hyperlinks and URLs may not be used to provide information necessary to application review.
  • Reviewers are not obligated to view linked sites and are cautioned that they should not directly access a website (unless the link to the site was specifically requested in application instructions) as it could compromise their anonymity.
  • When allowed, you must hyperlink the actual URL text so it appears on the page rather than hiding the URL behind a specific word or phrase.

Examples:

In Brief intervention to encourage empathic discipline cuts suspension rates in half among adolescents (Okaonofua et al.), found that students who feel respected are less likely to act up in class and it can change how hard students are willing to work in class.  They also found that respect is defined differently by the teachers (cooperation and compliance) and students (basic recognition of your humanity).

Marginalization: A Revisitation With Integration of Scholarship on Globalization, Intersectionality, Privilege, Microaggressions, and Implicit Biases (Hall and Carlson), provide health-oriented update of the concept of marginalization.

Mixed-Methods Research in the Discipline of Nursing (Beck & Harrison), offer strategies for nurses interested in applying mixed methods to the research design.

Naturejobs is a nature blog.  In How not to respond to reviewers: Eight simple tips the author, Jack Lemming, offers practical advice on how to get started addressing reviewer feedback.

Serotonin engages an anxiety and fear-promoting circuit in the extended amygdala explores SSRIs and their “darker” side.

Genome-wide associations for birth weight and correlations with adult disease found that birthweight is influenced by genes also related to other diseases.

Looking for a good book?  Check out Nature’s top 5 science picks.

Students, has your instructor or chair suggested you hire an editor? Faculty, do you need a second pair of eyes to look at your publication drafts? I have great news for you; WSU writing program now has a New Professional Editing Service Center. This service is open to all grad students and faculty.

The National Institute of Nursing Research’s (NINR) new Strategic Plan, “Advancing Science, Improving Lives: A Vision for Nursing Science,” is now available. The Plan details the Institute’s priorities for the conduct and support of future nursing science.


Research – Just for Fun

An unexpected advantage of whiteness in horses: the most horsefly-proof horse has a depolarizing white coat  see what researchers do to determine the best protective factors against horseflies.horse


Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Nguyen-Truong, Connie Kim Yen., Tang, Joannie, & Hsiao, Chiao-Yun (in press). Community interactive research workshop series – community members engaged as team teachers to conduct research. Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action.

Invited Publication

Nguyen-Truong, Connie Kim Yen. (in press). Vietnamese and Asian Pacific Islander Spotlight Feature: Vietnamese Women’s Breast and Cervical Health Project. In Women’s Foundation of Oregon 2016 Count Her In Report on Women and Girls.

*The Women’s Foundation of Oregon will be releasing the 2016 Count Her In Report on Women and Girls, September 21, 2016, on the Capitol Steps in Salem, OR. The report will be available for public domain use – weblink to be released.

Rutman, S., Loughran, J., Henry-Tanner, L. & Randall, L.L.. (2016).  Native Generations: A Campaign Addressing Infant Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in Urban Areas. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. Vol 23(5):59-77.

Wilson, M., Gettel, V., Walsh, J. Esquenazi, S. (2016). Caring compassionately for hospitalized patients: Can nurse-delivered massage address compassion fatigue? International Journal for Human Caring, 20(3), 146–154.

Recent Presentations

Fincham, S. & Mason, A. “Developing a Collaborative Longitudinal Interprofessional Education Program Using Standardized Patients”, DNP National Conference, Baltimore, MD, October 2016.

James, L. (September 2016) Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) National Policing Summit. “How academia can influence police training and policy around implicit bias.” Key panelist by invitation. Brunswick, GA.

James, L. (August 2016). Does Implicit Racial Bias Influence Police Decisions to Shoot? Evidence and Implications. Oregon District Attorney’s Association (ODAA) annual conference (guest speaker by invitation). Bend, OR

James, L. (July 2016). Tactical Social Interaction (TSI): Promoting Cultural Humility and Social Competence across a Range of Disciplines. Washington State University Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine Brown Bag Series. Spokane, WA.

James, L. (March 2016). Using Multi-Level-Modeling (MLM) for Repeated Measures Designs. Washington State University College of Nursing Analytical Brown Bag Series. Spokane, WA.

James, L. (February 2016). Fatigue, Distraction, and Bias: What they mean for Law Enforcement and the Communities they Serve. Washington State University Common Reading Series. Pullman, WA.

Wilson, M., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Mason, A., Graham, K., Shuen, J.A., Wilson, M. “Testing an internet-based depression management program for people with chronic illnesses and depressive symptoms”, Inland Northwest Research Symposium, Spokane, WA, April 2016.

Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they share results from an NIH study investigating a drug to treat alcohol use disorder.

The National Institute of Nursing Research “News and Notes” – This month they share NINR’s new strategic plan.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH. This month they share HHS’s actions to address children infected with the Zika Virus.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month discuss the benefits of Title V funding for mothers and children.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share a new promise for a cure for HIV after treating the first patient with a new treatment.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: validity, reliability, factor, testing, classification.  …I call it affect.

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – September 2016

Research Office

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review is WSU College of Nursing’s newsletter covering faculty research and efforts to improve health and healthcare through scholarly inquiry and investigation.

What’s New in Grants?

The College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health investigators, in either the PI role or Co-I role, submitted three new proposals in August, totaling $2,353,890 in requested funds:

PI: Sterling McPherson, Co-Is: Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Matt Layton, Mike McDonell, John Roll, Kawkab Shishani. Behavioral Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment for Alcohol and Tobacco Coaddiction. NIH. $2,290,684.

PI: Lonnie Nelson, Co-I: Dedra Buchwald. The First Annual Summit on Urban Native Elder Health and Health Care. NIH/NIGMS. $49,718.

PIs: Cindy Corbett, Josh Neumiller, Co-I: Brian Gates. Preserving Self: Empowering Older Persons Who Take Multiple Medications. WSU Fdn/Empire Health Foundation. $13,488.

Congratulations!

Five new awards were received by College of Nursing and Nursing/Community Health/Health Policy Administration investigators in August, totaling $3,328,425 in funding:

PI: Dedra Buchwald, Co-I: Ka’imi Sinclair. Diet Intervention for Hypertension: Adaptation and Dissemination to Native Communities. NIH/NHLBI. $636,433.

PI: Dedra Buchwald, Co-Is: Lonnie Nelson, Ka’imi Sinclair. Native Elder Research Center. University of Colorado Denver: subcontract on NIH. $146,804.

PI: Dedra Buchwald, Co-Is: Amanda Boyd, Clemma Muller, Sean Murphy, Ka’imi Sinclair. Native-Controlling Hypertension And Risk through Technology (Native-CHART). NIH/NIMHHD. $2,078,480.

PI: Megan Moore & Joana Ramos. Co-Is: Carmen Gonzalez, Janessa Graves, Nathalia Jimenez, Martine Pierre-Louis, Monica Vavilala. Addressing Language Needs to Improve the Health Care Access and Utilization by Latinos in Washington (WA) State. Latino Center for Health, University of Washington (UW).

PI: Ka’imi Sinclair, Co-I: Lonnie Nelson. Strong Men, Strong Communities: Cultural Tradition to Improve Native Men’s Health. NIH/NIDDK. $466,708.

Other Good News

Linda Ward received the 2016 ISONG Founder’s Award for Excellence in Genomic Nursing Education at this year’s International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG)’s annual congress.


Research Wisdom

Cindy Corbett, Associate Dean of Research

Colleagues, during the past four months, I’ve had the opportunity to participate in three NIH review groups and one joint NSF/NIH review group.  These experiences affirmed that the competition is stiff and the bar is very high. NIH funding has remained level since 2003 despite inflation and increasing numbers of applicants. In fact, at the NINR meeting I attended in May, the scientific review officer displayed the graph below and jokingly or (not?) stated this is why he now worked at NIH versus continuing his own career as an investigator. The graph shows that over a five year period, unique applicants have increased significantly from ~60,000 to ~90,000 investigators, but the number of awards during those same five year periods have remained virtually unchanged (see the full article with additional graphs).

Thus, to obtain NIH funding, we are challenged to submit virtually flawless applications. One strategy for doing so is to seek internal peer review on near-final drafts of your proposals.  I recently asked for internal peer review for a R21 proposal that was being resubmitted after a fairly good score in the prior submission.  We received important feedback to strengthen the revised proposal despite that fact that the team thought it was pretty strong before we asked for internal review.

The Research Office has an interactive template that can help you establish a writing timeline that includes time for internal peer review.  We can send it to you and/or help you complete it.  We can also help suggest or obtain internal reviewers. More good reasons to contact us as soon as you know you’ll be submitting a grant application!

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Research Spotlight

Marian Wilson studies opioid dependence in people with chronic pain. She is also recruiting patients from the methadone clinic for a study exploring non-pharmacologic methods of managing pain such as cognitive behavioral therapy, relaxation/meditation, and physical exercise.

Using an online pain self-management program, patients can choose and integrate alternative therapies while tracking their progress in decreasing both pain and the associated need for opioid use. Wilson says the program has shown positive results in prior studies.

“Fifty percent of our methadone clients have legitimate medical problems like cancer or rheumatoid arthritis that got them started on pain pills in the first place,” says Matt Layton, a fellow researcher.

Wilson agrees and said, “Serious gaps remain in understanding how the transition from ‘pain patient’ to ‘addict’ occurs.” As a result, people with chronic pain are often stigmatized and have difficulty in receiving appropriate care.”

Click hear to read the full article, The Epidemic, in the Washington State Magazine, by Rebecca Phillips.


Research FYI

Turn the Tide is the Surgeon General’s call to end the opioid crisis in the United States.  Click here to read Vivek H. Murthy’s (19th U.S. Surgeon General) letter and if inclined, sign the petition.

The WSU Office of Research and the Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy & Public Service welcomes you to a day focused on the opportunities and constraints of cannabis research at Washington State University on Friday, September 30.  Robert MacCoun, who is the James and Patricia Kowel Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, will provide the keynote address and three panels will be followed by a summary session.  For more information click here.

Did you know you can upload all your manuscripts into The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)?  Once you have all your manuscripts uploaded and categorized, the same site will generate an NIH formatted biosketch for you.  Check out the site here.

Washington State University Social & Economic Sciences Research Center will be offering Survey Design Clinics in fall 2016.  They accept walk in consultations only. Learn more.

Washington State University Office of Research Support and Operations is offering six How To series during the fall semester.  Learn more. 

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) is pleased to announce it is now accepting applications for its 2017 Graduate Partnerships Program. Click here for full details.

Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has a blog and this month they delve into the obstacle of Engaging Clinicians in Patient-Centered Research.  Their helpful advice, while applicable to patient-centered research, is a good model for all research partners.

Higher Minimum Wages Lead to Healthier Newborns, According to Two New Studies by Elissa Strauss explores two articles with very similar findings; as minimum wage increases so do birth weights.  Additional improved outcomes included; increased fetal growth, reduced postnatal mortality, and maternal factors such as an increase in prenatal care and a decrease in smoking.

ScienceDaily shared research out of the University of Virginia in American Liberals and Conservatives Think as if from Different Cultures(T. Talhelm, J. Haidt, S. Oishi, X. Zhang, F. F. Miao, S. Chen.) Liberals Think More Analytically (More “WEIRD”) Than Conservatives. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2014; 41 (2): 250 DOI:10.1177/0146167214563672).  An interesting read in how we form and evolve in our political thinking.


Research – Just for Fun

Face expression of lazy child to eat salad. shot in the kitchen room

Make a Face! Implicit and Explicit Measurement of Facial Expressions Elicited by Orange Juices Using Face Reading Technology,” Lukas Danner, Liudmila Sidorkina, Max Joechl, and Klaus Duerrschmid, Food Quality and Preference, vol. 32B, 2013, pp. 167–172, and “Consumer Facial Expression in Relation to Smoked Ham With the Use of Face Reading Technology. The Methodological Aspects and Informative Value of Research Results,” Eliza Kostyra, Bożena Waszkiewicz-Robak, Wacław Laskowski, Tadeusz Blicharski, and Ewa Poławska, Meat Science, vol. 119, September 2016, pp. 22–31 had conflicting findings regarding the relationship between the product and the expression.


Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Altman, M. & Brinker, D. (2016). Nursing social entrepreneurship leads to positive change. Nursing Management 47(7): 28-32.

Sprint, G., Cook, D., Fritz, R. Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (2016) Detecting health and behavior change by analyzing smart home sensor data. 2016 IEEE International Conference on Smart Computing (SMARTCOMP). Conference Paper. doi:10.1109/SMARTCOMP.2016.7501687.

Dyck, D.G., Weeks, D.L., Gross, S., Smith, C.L., Lott, H.A., Wallace, A.J., & Wood, S.M. (2016). Comparison of two psycho-educational family group interventions for improving psycho-social outcomes in persons with spinal cord injury and their caregivers: a randomized-controlled trial of multi-family group intervention versus an active education control condition. BMC psychology, 4(1), 1.

Graves, J. M., & Klein, T. A. (2016). Nurse Practitioners’ Comfort in Treating Work-Related Injuries in Adolescents.(June, 2016, online ahead of print). Workplace Health & Safety. doi: 10.1177/2165079916653612.

Klein, T., Panther, S., Woo, T., Odom-Maryon, T. & Daratha, K. Prescriber variance in childhood ADHD treatment: Findings from Oregon Medicaid 2012. (May 2016, online ahead of print) Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. doi:10.1089/cap.2015.0255.

Klein, T. & Graves, J. (2016, in press). Psychiatric nurse practitioner diagnosis and cognitive recommendations for mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.

Wainwright, A., Klein, T. & Daly, C. (2016, in press). Competency development to support nurse practitioner prescribing of controlled drugs and substances in British Columbia. Policy, Politics and Nursing Practice.

Kaplan, L., Klein, T., Skillman, S., & Andrilla, C. H. (2016). Faculty supervision of NP program practicums: A comparison of rural and urban site differences. The Nurse Practitioner41(7), 36-42.

Branas, C.C., Kondo, M.C., Murphy, S.M., South, E.C., Polsky, D., MacDonald, J.M. (In press). The value of remediating blighted urban environments as a solution to firearm violence. American Journal of Public Health.

Neven, D., Paulozzi, L., Howell, D., McPherson, S., Murphy, S.M., Grohs, R., Marsh, L., Lederhos, C., & Roll, J. (In press). A randomized controlled trial of a citywide emergency department care coordination program. Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Delane, A., Bohórquez, J., Gupta, S., & Schiavenato, M. (2016). Lomb Algorithm versus Fast Fourier Transform in Heart Rate Variability Analyses of Pain in Premature Infants. 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Conference Proceedings.


Recent Presentations

Dammeyer, K., Robinson, B. Braley, R., Fritz, R., Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (August 2016). Aiding everyday activities with prompting technology: A qualitative analysis of dementia participants’ experiences. Pullman, Washington. Washington State University Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Symposium.


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they share the work NIH is doing to address the Zika virus.

The National Institute of Nursing Research “News and Notes” – NINR has released a new series of videos titled “Building and Sustaining a Scholarly Career”. The videos provide an overview of opportunities and dilemmas often encountered by mid-career scientists as they work to develop a sponsored project into a successful and sustained program of research

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH. This month, Sherri Cummins from the NIH Office of Extramural Research, discusses the various options for submitting grant applications to NIH on the Listen and Learn podcast.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month discuss the benefits of Title V funding for mothers and children.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month scientists have demonstrated for the first time the ‘perfect storm’ of conditions that cells need to start forming cancer, helping to explain why some organs are more susceptible than others.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: solved, charted, citation, experience, probability. …called research.

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – August 2016

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Coug Nurse Scholarly Review is WSU College of Nursing’s newsletter covering faculty research and efforts to improve health and healthcare through scholarly inquiry and investigation.

What’s New in Grants?

WSU College of Nursing investigators (in either the PI or Co-I role) submitted four new proposals in July totaling $740,184 of requested funds:

PI: Shannon Panther, Co-Is: Karen Colorafi, Kimberly McKeirnan. Utilizing Academic Detailing to Improve Pharmacy Personnel Knowledge of ACIP Adult Pneumococcal Immunization Guidelines. Pfizer, Inc. $250,000

PI: Hans Van Dongen, Co-Is: Devon Grant, Kimberly Honn, Lois James, Stephen James, Bryan Vila. Instrumentation for Physiological and Neurobehavioral Measurement in Around-the-Clock, High-Fidelity Laboratory Studies of the Impact of Fatigue on Warfighter Performance. DOD/Navy. $280,972

PI: Joseph Iannelli, Co-I: Debra Nogueras. Regional Alliance and Multistakeholder Partnership to Stimulate (RAMPS) Cybersecurity Education and Workforce Development in the State of Washington. US Dept. of Commerce/NIST/NICE. $199,848

PI: Sandy Carollo, Co-I: Janet Katz. Advancing Health, Education, and Support for Teens in the Yakima Valley. WSU Foundation/Yakima Valley Community Foundation. $9,364


Congratulations!

Klein

Dr. Tracy Klein, Assistant Professor at WSU College of Nursing in Vancouver (pictured, left) and Dr. Teri Woo, Associate Dean for Graduate Nursing Programs at Pacific Lutheran University, presented their research at the American Association of Nurse Practitioners 2016 National Conference in San Antonio, Texas, on June 23, 2016. Their study, Prescriber Patterns for ADHD: A Comparison of NPs and Physicians, highlights findings from a large database analysis of Oregon Medicaid records completed in conjunction with WSU faculty Dr. Kenn Daratha, Dr. Tamara Maryon-Odom, and pharmacist Dr. Shannon Panther. Similarities between mental health and non-mental health prescribers were found regardless of whether they were MDs or NPs, demonstrating that NPs with broad prescriptive authority do not have aberrant patterns of prescribing medications. Photo Credit: Bob Smithing, ARNP, FAANP.


July: New Funding

Funding for eight new projects was awarded in July totaling $1,670,599:

PI: Barb Richardson, Co-Is: Brenda Bray, Matt Layton, Tamara Odom-Maryon, Janet Purath, Catrina Schwartz, Kevin Stevens, Megan Willson. Spokane Teaching Health Center SBIRT Student Training. SAMHSA Continuation. $259,864

PI: Cindy Corbett, Co-Is: Kenn Daratha, Catherine Van Son. Chronic Care Management Model Translation to Multimorbid Aging Adults at FQHCs. NIH/NIA Continuation. $257,309

PI: Sterling McPherson, Co-Is: Jo Ann Dotson, Michele Shaw, Matt Layton. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) Reference and Decision Support Tool. Ringful Health. $39,148

PI: Julie Postma, Co-Is: Karen Colorafi, Michele Shaw. Advancing Patient-Centered Research in the Puget Sound Asthma Coalition. PCORI Tier III. $49,919

PI: Linda Eddy. Children’s BH Workforce Collaborative. WA DSHS Renewal. $828,200

PI: Linda Eddy. Peer Support Training Initiatives. WA DSHS Amendment. $600

PI: Linda Eddy. Peer Support Training Initiatives. WA DSHS Supplement. $13,200

PI: Linda Eddy. Children’s BH Workforce Collaborative: ASAM Training. WA DSHS Renewal. $120,078

PI: Cindy Corbett, Co-I: Ruth Bryant. Staff Assignment Agreement between WSU and PMRC 2016. Providence Medical Research Center. $22,651

PI: Rebecca Craft. Co-Is: Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Marian Wilson, Michelle Shaw and Sean Murphy. Marijuana Use: Health Benefits vs. Health Risks. 2016 Grand Challenge Seed Grant Program WSU. $74,630

Teresa Bigand was awarded a 2016 Anthony J. Jannetti Nursing Economic Foundation Scholarship for $5,000.


Research FYI

In a recent article, Why Social Science Risks Irrelevance, featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Danah Boyd states, “If we want social science to matter, we need to be much more thoughtful about the questions we ask.”

The microbiome in early life: implications for health outcomes is a review that explores pre and post-natal factors that influence the development of the microbiome and the immune system.

Encouraging Realistic Expectations in STEM Students: Paradoxical Effects of a Motivational Intervention shares results when an intervention backfires.

Are you or do you know someone that would be interested in applying for a yearlong fellowship in Washington DC that will bring together public health and policy making?  The APHA is currently accepting application for this amazing opportunity.  The due date is 8/15/16.  For more information click here.

Hospitals Fail To Protect Nursing Staff From Becoming Patients discusses the physical toll lifting heavy patients has on nursing staff and asks what hospital are doing to protect their staff.

The WSU Office of Research Advancement and Partnerships in Pullman invites you to attend one of their many Brown Bag Information and Training Sessions for proposal development.  They are held weekly in Lighty 280 at noon.  For a full list and description of the scheduled brown bags click here.

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) has agreed to pay a settlement of $2,700,000 for potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR).  The full story can be found here.


Research – Just for Funapple


Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Graves JM, Mackelprang JL, Barbosa-Leiker C, Miller ME, Li YA. (In press.) Quality of life among working and non-working adolescents. Quality of Life Research.

Nogueres, D., Postma, J.,Van Son, C. (In press). Why Didn’t I Know? Perspectives from Adult Children of Elderly Parents with Dementia.  Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

O’Neal, G., Postma, J., Odom-Maryon, T., Butterfield, P. (Accepted; Epub ahead of print). The household risk perception instrument and the self-efficacy in environmental risk reduction instrument: Psychometric testing using Principal Component Analyses. Research in Nursing and Health. doi: 10.1002/nur.21730.

Postma, Julie; Younglove, Lisa R.; Brooks, Kerry; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Beresford, Shirley; Burbacher, Thomas; Butterfield, Phillip; Butterfield, Patricia; Cederblom, Nicole; Grant, Kimberly; and Faustman, Elaine M. (2016). Hispanic Representation in a Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study. Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice. 9(3) Article 4. Available at: http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/jhdrp/vol9/iss2/4

Postma, J. & Ramon, C. (In press). Strengthening community capacity for environmental health promotion through photovoice. Public Health Nursing. doi: 10.1111/phn.12243

Rutman, S., Loughran, L., Henry-Tanner, L. & Randall, L.L. (2015; In Press.) Native Generations: A Campaign Addressing Infant Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in Urban Areas.


Recent Presentations

Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 10.32.02 AMWashington State University College of Nursing was well represented this year at the annual Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) conference, held in Anaheim, CA.  View a a complete list of those who participated.

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy, J (6/27/16). Cost-related Medication Nonadherence Declined After Passage of the ACA, Academy Health Annual Research Meeting, Boston

Kennedy, J (7/28/16). The Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living: Policy Forum, National Council on Independent Living Annual Meeting, Washington DC

Kennedy, J (7/29/16). The Impact of the ACA on Adults with Disabilities, Anthem National Advisory Board on Improving Health Care Services for Older Adults and People with Disabilities, Washington DC

Paul, R, National Congress of American Indian (NCAI) 11th Annual NCAI Policy Research Center Tribal Leader/Scholarship Forum in Spokane, WA. Achieving Success and Overcoming Barriers while Achieving Your Goal of a College Degree. June 29, 2016.

Ball T., (Modoc & Klamath); Pardilla, M. (Dine’); Randall, L.L. (Nez Perce); & Ball, A. (Colville) NARCH PI. (2016). Shifting the Paradigm:  Moving from the academic helicopter research model to Tribal Research. Preconference Workshop at the 26th Native Health Research Conference June 2016.

Randall, L.L., Katz, J., Doutrich, D. L., Holliday, C., & Paul, R.L. (2016, June).  Indigenous Methods. Presented in concurrent session: Tribal Research Models, at 26th Native Health Research Conference, Cherokee, NC.

Schiavenato, M. On Being a MarkerNurse. [Invited Speaker]. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholars Program.  July 13, 2016; Colorado Springs, CO.


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month includes results from a genetics study that used genetic profiles from people who purchased their profile online and volunteered their results to researcher.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – Starting August 1, NINR will begin accepting applications for its 2017 Graduate Partnerships Program, an Institutional Partnership that combines the academic environment of a university with the comprehensive research resources available at the NIH.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH.  This month they share a one page guide to rigor and reproducibility in your NIH application.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month see how HRSA is impacting the health and wellness of communities through funding awards.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share research on the first single actuator wave-like robot (SAW) has been developed by engineers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU). The 3D-printed robot can move forward or backward in a wave-like motion, moving much like a worm would in a perpendicular wave.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: cognition, manuscript, academic, labeled, hierarchy; …teachable moments

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – July 2016

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What’s New in Grants?

The College of Nursing had nine new proposals submitted in June for a total of $4,062,327 in requested funding.  Eight proposals were submitted in Spokane and one in Vancouver.

The Research Office is here to help you with your submission. If you will be a co-investigator on a proposal with someone in another department/college, please let Kathy Bridwell in the Nursing Research Office know. Also be sure that Kathy and Brett Oglesbee are on the eREX as department contacts, and Tamara Odom-Maryon is on the eREX as the college approver. Let us know as soon as you decide to apply as we can help you explore funding opportunities and set up regular meetings to support your submission. Contact Kathy Bridwell for more information.


Congratulations!

Lori Brown was awarded $320,000 from HRSA, Nurse Faculty Loan Repayment Program to help prepare graduate nurses for careers as nurse educators by providing financial support to graduate students.

Lois James was awarded $189,000 (Steve James Co-I and Bryan Vila expert consultant) from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for her project that will provide online training for law enforcement to reduce risks associated with shift work and long work hours.

Connie K. Y. Nguyen-Truong, was awarded $3,000 from Washington State University Vancouver Research Mini-Grant for her work: Vietnamese Women’s Breast and Cervical Health Project, studying beliefs about breast and cervical cancer and barriers and facilitators to screening to inform the development of a culturally appropriate educational intervention.

Debbie Nogueras was awarded $341,000 (Eva Schiavenato Co-I) from HRSA, Advanced Education Nurse Traineeship to provide scholarship dollars to DNP/FNP students who commit to working in underserved communities post-graduation.

Debbie Nogueras was awarded $349,187 (Co-Is: Lori Brown and Eric Johnson) from HRSA, Nursing Pathways: Community Alliance for Health.  HRSA Workforce Diversity Grant. This award seeks to address health and educational disparities by increasing the number of disadvantaged students graduating from the BSN program that commit to providing culturally competent health care to underserved populations.

Did we miss your good news? Please let us know so we can share in our next newsletter!


Research Wisdom

“Innovation” in Grant Writing

Lois James, Ph.D.

What is innovation in grant writing and why is it important? Collectively the “significance and innovation” section of your proposal justifies the need for your study. With the exception of your specific aims page, it is perhaps the most important section of your proposal, and it needs to convince your reviewers that your idea is novel and important. Innovation is “a new/different way of considering/addressing an important problem” that also “enables new horizons in research/treatment.” Innovation should be woven throughout your entire proposal, starting with the conceptualization of your project.

The first step in ensuring innovation in grant writing is to be up to date with the existing literature. It is no use declaring that you are the first to conduct your proposed research if in fact you are not. My advice is to catalog prior studies on the topic, then critically synthesize the existing body of work, which will allow you to identify strengths and weaknesses in the field. From there, you will be able to specify HOW your study will address the gaps in the literature, and thus advance the science.

The next step is to make your innovation apparent in each section of your proposal – starting with the title. Consider the following examples:

“Analyzing the effects of sleep deprivation on participants shooting, driving, and cognitive performance” (I would argue that, although interesting, the innovation of this study is not readily evident in this title)

“Using novel experimental research data to better understand and manage fatigue across the range of military operations” (In this version—of the same study—the title conveys more novelty and urgency)

The next section in which innovation needs to be clear is in the specific aims page. This can be done in a very direct way, for example:

“We believe our research is innovative because the Sleep for Your Health program uses goal setting, experimentation, cooperative learning, problem solving, and active involvement to motivate adolescents to improve their sleep habits in meaningful and sustainable ways”

Or in a subtler way, for example:

“The work we propose has the potential to radically change established training practices and multiply the effectiveness of Marines and soldiers on the ground in counterinsurgency, peacekeeping, nation building and humanitarian missions.”

This brings us to the actual innovation portion of the “significance and innovation” section. Here I find it is best to follow the formula: First, cite existing literature so that reviewers have an idea of the status quo in your field. Second, directly state why you believe your work advances from the status quo (remember that to be innovative your work must result in positive impact, change, and scientific advance). Finally, discuss what new horizons will be opened as a result of your research. It is helpful to tie this back to the long-term goals of your research.

Continue to integrate your study’s innovation into the research approach (particularly if you are using a novel tool or design) and expected outcomes of your proposal.

Finally, what do you do if you have a valuable contribution that is not innovative? Remember that not all funded studies are novel and unique. Reliability in research is critical, and sometimes studies need to replicated before a particular methodology or finding can be considered the gold standard or status quo. Pursuit of this is important to, but be sure you make very clear in your proposal why your contribution will be significant.


Research FYI

WSU College of Nursing Vancouver Research

contributed by Anita Hunter

From working to improve the health of women and children and their access to clean water in Uganda, to evaluating trends in Nurse Practitioner-managed care and assessment of various conditions and diseases, our researchers are passionate about WSU’s Grand Challenges and asking questions that will help improve the health of individuals and communities. Four of our faculty received institutional mini-grants to continue their research about heavy metals in Uganda, Vietnamese breast health program, the smart homes project, and aging services technology. Our interdisciplinary approach to education and research helps us meet these challenges of sustaining health and access to resources while striving to improve the quality of life for all. For example, we have a large, interdisciplinary and interinstitutional grant targeted toward improving behavioral health for children and adolescents across the State of Washington.

Specifically, our WSU Vancouver College of Nursing faculty:

  • Strives to understand the cultural, social, and environmental determinants of optimal health
  • Engages communities, providing health education and assessments
  • Works to understand public health both locally and globally and how it relates to the onset and progression of disease.
  • Promotes healthy communities and populations by conducting research aimed at improving access to clean water, food, education, and healthcare

Learn more about the research projects and initiative our nursing scholars are engaged in:


Research – Just for Fun

body odor

Nose-witness Identification: Effects of Lineup Size and Retention Interval explores a witness’s ability to identify a suspect by their body odor.  Odor memory has longer retention and researchers found the participants were able to identify the suspect ~55% of the time.


Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Barron, Sara. (2016). Making the call: Reporting a cluster of cases of anencephaly. Nursing2016 46(7): 52-58.

Katz, J. R., Barbosa-Leiker, C., & Benavides-Vaello, S. (2016). Measuring the Success of a Pipeline Program to Increase Nursing Workforce Diversity. Journal of Professional Nursing. 32 (1) doi:10.1016/j.profnurs.2015.05. 003.

Nogueras, D., Postma, J., & Van Son, C. (2016). Why Didn’t I Know? Perspectives from Adult Children of Elderly Parents with Dementia. Submitted to Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/2327-6924.12382

O’Neal, G., Postma, J., Odom-Maryon, T., Butterfield, P. The household risk perception instrument and the self-efficacy in environmental risk reduction instrument: Psychometric testing using Principal Component Analyses. Research in Nursing and Health. doi: 10.1002/nur.21730. [Epub ahead of print]

Kooienga, S., Rasmor, M “Shoulder Pain Assessment for the Occupational Health Nurse” Workplace Health & Safety. June 9, 2015

Did we miss your publication? Please let us know so we can share next in the next newsletter! Please send a link to your publication to Kathy Bridwell so she can post it on the research publications board.


Recent Presentations

Washington State University College of Nursing was well represented this year at the annual Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) conference, held in Anaheim, CA.  For a complete list of those who participated please click here.

Barbosa-Leiker, C., Katz, J. R., Wynne, M., Holliday, C., Ford, C. (2016) Development of a Community Program Capacity Scale for a Rural American Indian Tribe The Western Institute of Nursing 49th Annual Communicating  Nursing Research Conference, Anaheim, CA. 

James, L. (May 2016). Differences between Implicit and Explicit Bias in Police Decisions to Shoot. Association of Psychological Science, Annual Conference, Chicago, Il.

James, L. (April 2016). Implicit Bias vs. Ferguson Effects: Findings and Implications to Date. “Can Psychology Improve Policing?” Workshop (guest speaker by invitation). Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Katz, J., Holliday, C., WSU; Spokane Tribe Community: Wynne, M., Ford, C., and Spokane Tribal Youth. Ta hec čmiš qn   mist I Will Never Give Up: Storytelling of a Community Partnership. Community Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) Conference. New Orleans LA May 15, 2016.

Murphy, S.M., McPherson, S., Layton, M., & Kennedy, J. (06/27/2016). Antipsychotic utilization among Washington state dual eligibles. Academy Health Annual Research Meeting, Boston

Murphy, S.M., Campbell A.N.C., Ghitza U.E., Kyle T.L., Bailey G.L., Nunes E.V., Polsky D. (06/14/2016). Cost-effectiveness of an internet-delivered treatment for substance abuse: data from a multisite randomized controlled trial. American Society of Health Economists Sixth Biennial Conference, Philadelphia

Patricia Cox, DNP, MPH, FNP-BC, Melody Rasmor, EdD, FNP-BC, COHN-SAn Occupational Hazard of War: Musculoskeletal Injuries.  American Association of Nurse Practitioners’, San Antonio, Texas June 21, 2016

Rasmor, M. Musculoskeletal Assessment for the Occupational Health Nurse, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses. Webinar Presenter June 2, 2016

Richardson, Barbara. April 18th and 19th, 2016. Promoting Interprofessional Education. Invited speaker at the ATI National Nurse Educators Summit. Nashville, TN.

Richardson, Barbara and Bray, Brenda. May 20, 2016. Boots on the ground; Putting interprofessional education into action. 6 hour workshop. Robert Morris University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Did we miss your presentation? Please let us know so we can share next month!


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they highlight a Single IRB Policy for multi-site research.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – This month they highlight Dr. Patricia Grady’s (NINR director) and Dr. Jeri Miller’s publication that addresses the future of palliative care.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they highlight National Women’s Health Week.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share research that found the benefit’s of coffee outweigh the risks..

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: Flexibility, Range, Statistic, Inference, Neutrality, …Self-flattery

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – June 2016

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What’s New in Grants?

College of Nursing had nine new proposals submitted in May.  Five proposals were submitted in Spokane and four in Vancouver.

If you will be a co-investigator on a proposal with someone in another department/college, please let Kathy Bridwell in the Nursing Research Office know. Also be sure that Kathy and Brett Oglesbee are on the eREX as department contacts, and Tamara Odom-Maryon is on the eREX as the college approver.

The Research Office is here to help you with your submission. Let us know as soon as you decide to apply as we can help you explore funding opportunities and set up regular meetings to support your submission. Contact Kathy Bridwell for more information.


Congratulations!

Linda Eddy was awarded two WA DSHS contracts: Ombuds/Quality Review Team Training for $8,250, and System of Care for $85,000.

Tracy Klein received $7,500 from the College of Registered Nurses British Columbia for her project: Nurse Practitioner Prescribing Standards: College of Registered Nurses British Columbia.

Martin Schiavenato and his group were awarded $74,530 from the WSU 2016 Grand Challenges Seed Grant Program for their project titled, “Next Generation Continuously Monitored Reusable Low-Cost Biochemical I Physiologic Sensors with Predictive Wireless Electronics Powered by Enzymatic Biofuel Cells”.  This award is an internal multi-disciplinary award.  The team consists of the Principal Investigator, Subhanshu Gupta, from VCEA, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, Su Ha and Alla Kostyukova from VCEA, Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, and Yuehe Lin and Annie Du from VCEA, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.

Linda Ward received $24,811 from the National League for Nursing for her project: Implementation of a Cyberhub to Support Genomic Nursing Education.

Did we miss your good news? Please let us know so we can share in our next newsletter!


Research Wisdom

Forging a new path – challenges and opportunities

Phyllis Eide

My research interests are currently in the field of climate change and associated health impacts.  Since it was quite a change from my prior focus on breast cancer survivor research using interpretive phenomenology, I made a deliberate choice to become more informed in this new-to-me area.  That led me to the University of Washington’s newly developed certificate program in climate change and decision making.  As part of the inaugural class of 2009, I was the sole nurse in a student cohort that included lawyers, civil engineers, computer scientists, governmental officials, and graduate students.  The four course sequence addressed adaptation, the science of climate change, the business aspects of climate change and the legal implications.  Cooperating institutions besides UW (adaptation) were University of British Columbia (science), UC/Irvine (business), and Northwestern University (legal).  This gave me a foundation of knowledge which, combined with my nursing background and public health experience, has led to several podium and poster sessions at the regional and international levels.

My next step was to recruit colleagues to form a nursing and climate change writing group.  With a total of 4 members (one of whom is located in Washington DC and has extensive experience abroad with USAID), we have one article completed and under second review with a public health journal, a second article in draft form, and a third article sketched out – writing to commence this summer.  I’ve also conducted a pilot study on nurse educator attitudes re: climate change, and am in the process of analyzing the results.

Lastly, I’m taking a grant writing course this summer from ORAP/WSU Pullman.    I’m in a section with an energized and motivated group of junior faculty and postgrad students from the life sciences, astronomy, agriculture, etc.  This course is rightly challenging me to refine my ideas and work towards clarity in why I am proposing to do attitudinal research with nursing educators.

We are educating nurses whose careers will stretch towards the mid-century mark – a period during which climate change is anticipated to “exacerbate existing patterns of ill health, by acting on the underlying vulnerabilities that lead to ill health even without climate change” (http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg2/WGIIAR5-Chap11_FINAL.pdf).

How can we inspire nurse educators to include critical content about climate change’s effects on health (and to teach students about adaptive strategies they can use with their patients and clients in the years ahead)?  A first step is to get a sense of what educators believe about climate change, in order to  develop targeted outreach strategies that have the best chance of success in getting this content into curricula.

Changing direction in a research trajectory offers many challenges, not the least of which is going back to ‘square one’ in building up a new research direction, publication record, and grant seeking.  What has to balance those challenges is an idea that is so compelling – so ‘hair on fire’ important to you – that you are willing to strike out to new territory and forge that new path.


Research FYI

This PowerPoint presentation addresses the new NIH guidelines and comes from the NINR.  Please review and keep to increase familiarity with new guidelines.  This will be helpful for your future applications to NIH or AHRQ grants.

There is a new study using big data that has the potential to revolutionize health care. The Kavli HUMAN Project is a collaboration between the Kavli Foundation, the Institute for the Interdisciplinary Study of Decision Making at NYU, and the Center for Urban Science and Progress at NYU. Using Big data, the HUMAN project will attempt to create a comprehensive view of the human condition through which comprehensive questions can be pursued.

Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses published in Nature Genetics this month, found that genes contribute to a number of different mental illnesses and psychological traits.

Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US, published in May in the bmj, delve into the problem of medical errors, reporting them and combatting them.


Research – Just for Fun

The Effect of Environmental Odors Emanating from Commercial Swine Operations on the Mood of Nearby Residents Not surprisingly, researchers found that people living near the intensive swine operations who experienced the odors, reported significantly more tension, more depression, more anger, less vigor, more fatigue, and more confusion than control subjects.

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Research Funnies

deadly sins comic


Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Abshire, D. A., Moser, D, K., Clasey, J. L., Chung, M. L., Pressler, S. J., Dunbar, S. B., Heo, S., & Lennie, T. A. (in press). Body composition and bone mineral density in patients with heart failure. Western Journal of Nursing Research.

Graves JM, Klein TA. Nurse practitioners’ comfort in treating work-related injuries in adolescents. Workplace Health and Safety. In press.

James, L., James, S., Vila, B. Does the “Reverse Racism Effect” Withstand the Test of Police Officer Fatigue? Policing: an International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, (in press).

Ward LD, Purath J, Barbosa-Leiker C. (2016). Assessment of genomic literacy among baccalaureate nursing students in the United States: A feasibility study. Nurse Educator. Advance online publication. doi:10.1097/NNE.0000000000000272

Ward LD, Bray BS, Odom-Maryon TL, Richardson B, Purath J, Woodard LJ, Kobayashi R, Beary J, Willson MN, Clauser JM, Fitzgerald C. (2016).  Development, Implementation and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Interprofessional Education Project. Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice, 3, 35-41. doi:10.1016/j.xjep.2016.04.003.

Did we miss your publication? Please let us know so we can share next in the next newsletter! Please send a link to your publication to Kathy Bridwell so she can post it on the research publications board.


Recent Presentations

Washington State University, College of Nursing was well represented this year at the annual Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) conference, held in Anaheim, CA.  For a complete list of those who participated please click here.

James, L. (April 2016). Implicit Bias vs. Ferguson Effects: Findings and Implications to Date. “Can Psychology Improve Policing?” Workshop (guest speaker by invitation). Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Kennedy, J (5/5/16). Health Reform and Independent Living, NARRTC Annual Meeting, Alexandria VA

Hu, H., DeLane, A., Schiavenato, M., Gupta, S. 3D UWB Localization Based Infant Pain Assessment System in Incubators Using Dynamic Averaging Algorithm and Ranging. [Poster]. BMES/FDA Frontiers in Medical Devices Conference. May 23, 2016; Washington, DC.

Simonson, D., & Hitchens, J. (2016, 5/14/2016). Creating an Open-Source Anesthesia EMR. Paper presented at the World Congress of Nurse Anesthetists, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

Did we miss your presentation? Please let us know so we can share next month!


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they highlight a program targeted at protecting first responders.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – This month they highlight Dr. Patricia Grady’s (NINR director) presentation on the future of nursing.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH – This month they explore the difference in the number of researchers seeking funding and the available funding.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they highlight major awards given across the US to improve health outcomes in the most vulnerable.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share research that has found a genetic cause for multiple sclerosis.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Puzzle key: confidence, control, covariate, deviation “…in a footnote!”

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – May 2016

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What’s New in Grants?

WSU College of Nursing had nine new proposals submitted in April.  Six proposals were submitted in Spokane, two in Vancouver, and one in Yakima. Three of these proposals were for internal funding.

If you will be a co-investigator on a proposal with someone in another department/college, please let Kathy Bridwell in the Nursing Research Office know. Also be sure that Kathy and Brett Oglesbee are on the eREX as department contacts, and Tamara Odom-Maryon is on the eREX as the college approver.

The Research Office is here to help you with your submission. Let us know as soon as you decide to apply as we can help you explore funding opportunities and set up regular meetings to support your submission. Contact Kathy Bridwell for more information.


Congratulations!

Demetrius AbshireDana Dermody

Demetrius Abshire and Dana Dermody were awarded $10,000 for their project titled, “Transitioning Into the Community after Hospitalization: Improving Physical and Psychosocial Well-Being through Self-Management of Physical Activity in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease” from the Empire Health Foundation 2016 Rural Aging Responsive Grant Cycle.

 

Celestina Barbosa-LeikerMichele Shaw

Celestina Barbosa-Leiker and Michele Shaw received $30,000 for their project titled, “ESD 101 Alternatives to Suspension Project” from the Spokane Regional Health District.

 

 

 

Shelly Fritz

Shelly Fritz was awarded $4,800 from Washington State University Vancouver Mini-Grant for her project titled, “Smart Home Technology to Support Healthy Aging: Adding a Clinician In-the-Loop.”

 

 

 

 

At the poster session at the WSU Vancouver Research Showcase, two DNP students won the graduate poster sessions. Millicent Mbua won first place. Eunjin Lipton was in the top 3.

Marian Wilson

Marian Wilson won the 2016 Excellence in Nursing Research Award from Sigma Theta Tau Delta Chi Chapter-at-Large. She also was awarded $5,000 from the Inland Northwest Community Foundation for her project, “Evaluation of a Way Forward,” a chronic pain peer program.

Did we miss your good news? Please let us know so we can share in our next newsletter!


Research Wisdom

Grant Writing Uncovered: Maximizing Strategies, Help, Opportunities, Experiences (GUMSHOE)

offered by the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN)

Faculty from WSU attended the GUMSHOE program April 18-20th.  This is a competitive program that required an attendee to complete the National Research Mentoring Network application, provide a letter of support from the applicant’s institutional mentor, submit a one-page specific aims page, provide two letters of recommendation from academic professionals, and a current curriculum vitae.  Twenty-one faculty grant writers were invited to attend, including 19 from the Pullman and Spokane campuses of Washington State University. Among the five from the College of Nursing who attended were Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Jo Ann Dotson, Janessa Graves, Sean Murphy and Marian Wilson.  Their review of their experience is at the end of this brief overview.

The 3 day workshop was just the beginning of the six month program.  Over the next several months, the grant writer will meet regularly with their assigned senior GUMSHOE mentor to draft, revise and finalize their grant application.  After the first month, each mentee is connected with a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Program Officer to get further feedback on the content and appropriate Institute for their application, thereby, strengthening their submission.  By the end of the six months, grant writers will have a strong application that is ready for submission.

The feedback is consistent: this program offers a unique and on target experience for any faculty looking to improve their grant writing skills and chances to receive funding.  The next program will be convened in Spokane on October 19, 20, and 21. For interested faculty, the complete applications are due September 26, 2016.  For information please click here.

Feedback from your colleagues:

“GUMSHOE was phenomenal. The information presented, the continuous reviews provided by the coaches and peers, and the mentoring really made this workshop seem like it will be a game-changer for my career. I highly recommend this workshop for all faculty members writing and/or reviewing grants-from junior faculty to full professors.” Celestina Barbosa-Leiker

“The Grantwriting Uncovered: Maximizing Strategy, Help, Opportunities, Experiences (GUMSHOE) admitted its second cohort of students at the WSU Spokane campus in April 2016.  Unlike many programs that support only the writing of a grant, this program lives up to its name by providing help and opportunities as well as the experiences of supportive mentors and guides to negotiate the NIH grant world.  Program directors Drs. Spero Manson (University of Colorado), Dedra Buchwald (Washington State University) and Robert Freishtat (George Washington University) direct this effort supported by the National Research Mentoring Network that links mentors with early career faculty mentees.  Mentees receive training and support from the directors and their coaches over a six month period.  Coaches provide their mentees with personalized input on their proposals and development via face to face or phone contacts routinely through the program.  The program is intended to 1) improve the junior faculty’s grant writing skills, 2) guide participants to develop and submit a proposal to NIH within six months, and 3) improve the likelihood that submitted grants will be scored and potentially funded.” JoAnn Dotson

As one of 21 of the April 2016 cohort, I feel extremely honored to have been included in the group, and look forward to developing and submitting a proposal. “With four other College of Nursing faculty members, I participated in the GUMSHOE program this week. It was an informative, fast-paced three days and I highly recommend it for all CON junior faculty. In the program, there was a strong focus on writing and revising specific aims, however, there was also didactic instruction, lots of time for questions, and substantial time dedicated to small groups working with a mentor/coach. The expertise and teaching style of the instructor team was impressive (prepared, supportive, and freely giving of their time).  I left campus at the end of the three intense days with renewed enthusiasm for grant writing and developing creative, collaborative, and interdisciplinary grant applications.  The up-coming six month coaching and writing process will undoubtedly continue to support this.”  Janessa Graves

“The workshop was great. The instructor and the coaches were very knowledgeable and friendly. In addition to gaining insight on how to improve each component of a proposal, we developed a deeper understanding of what goes on behind the scenes once the proposal has been submitted. Probably the most valuable part of the workshop was the amount of one-on-one attention we received during the breakout sessions with our coaches.” Sean Murphy

“This is exactly the sort of guidance I was hoping for a year ago as new faculty with no experience in seeking federal funding. I would strongly recommend that any new faculty who are expected to seek grant funding attend this workshop (and perhaps also senior faculty who do not feel adept at grant seeking or in mentoring others – they would likely learn some things, too). The workshop was full of great insiders’ tips and multiple opportunities for writing and feedback. I am looking forward to the ongoing mentoring and feedback from the senior faculty, but even without that I feel so much more prepared to submit, revise and resubmit grants than before.

Because I was also selected to attend the workshop by Peg Atkisson last year, I wanted to let you know I saw quite a difference in the style, and in my opinion, GUMSHOE has a better approach. Although that workshop was helpful as a starting point, GUMSHOE offered access to multiple, high-quality, highly-successful experts from many domains, not just one person’s point of view. I expect this will lead to overall better results in grant success. I also appreciated hearing from NIH program officers and learning more about their role and how to interact with them. This is information people may take for granted who have been in the business for a long time, but for new NIH grant writers, we really need and want this detailed, step-by-step instruction. We also need encouragement and for others to take an interest in our work, which was also provided generously by the GUMSHOE faculty. Dr. Freishtat, the main speaker each day was extremely entertaining and knowledgeable. The assigned coaches were excellent as well.

I would fully endorse encouraging others to make the commitment to attend GUMSHOE. I think this is a step in the right direction to increase faculty and overall university success in external funding. Thank you for supporting the workshop, and for supporting me in attending. Please feel free to share this feedback with any stakeholders who are in a position to make this offering available to faculty.”  Marian Wilson


Research FYI

The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The John A. Hartford Foundation, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, is soliciting proposals designed to accelerate the development of creative, robust and sustainable interprofessional initiatives in which graduate nursing and one or more other professions actively learn and work together with individuals and their families in community-based clinical settings. Due 7/15/16, a full description can be found here.

Washington State University’s Vice president for Research has issued Guidance on Cannabis Research, Teaching, and Outreach Activities. For more information click here.

Providence IRB has made changes to the CITI training courses required prior to conducting research. For more information click here.

For those submitting proposals using the SF424 forms after May 24, there are some changes to the application forms. Please make yourself familiar with the new Forms D. Here are some of the changes to look for:

  • New – “Data Safety Monitoring Plan” attachment (if applicable)
  • Modular budget – indirect costs section changed to dynamically add indirect costs
  • New – PHS Assignment Request Form (optional)
  • Planned Enrollment Report and Cumulative Inclusion Enrollment Report are combined into one form; some new questions

Biodegradable antigen-associated PLG nanoparticles tolerize Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation pre- and postsensitization found that in mice, there is a long-term and possible cure for asthma suffers.

The value of my PhD – Looking back one year after graduating, in a blog from naturejobs, and is an honest account of the realities of life after a PhD.

Depression in Nurses: The Unspoken Epidemic, “According to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI), nurses experience clinical depression at twice the rate of the general public. Depression affects 9% of everyday citizens, but 18% of nurses experience symptoms of depression.”

Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Infant Mortality in 38 U.S. States, 2012–2013 found that prepregancy weight significantly increased infant mortality rates.

Need help or a little motivation to write that manuscript, finish that grant?  Shut Up & Write Tuesdays may be the answer. Started in San Francisco, academics would meet at a coffee shop for quite focus and coffee all to meet the end of writing. The website offers a similar virtual experience to take advantage of group support and structure.


Research – Just for Fun

Vocal Recognition of Owners by Domestic Cats and Social referencing and cat-human communication found that cats are able to use vocal cues to distinguish between humans and that cats make behavior changes aligned with the emotional message delivered by their owners.

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Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Burley, M. H., Daratha, K. B., Tuttle, K., White, J. R., Wilson, M., Armstrong, K., . . . Selinger, S. (2016). Connecting Patients to Prescription Assistance Programs: Effects on Emergency Department and Hospital Utilization. Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy, 1-7. doi:10.18553/jmcp.2016.15282

Colorafi, K. (2016). Connected Health: A Review of the Literature. mHealth, 2(13), 1-15. DOI:10.21037/mhealth.2016.03.09

Behtold D, Salvatierra GG, Bulley E, Cypro A, Daratha KB. . Geographic Variation in Treatment and Outcomes among Patients with AMI: Investigating Urban-Rural Differences Among Hospitalized Patients. J Rural Health. 2015 Dec 3. PMID: 26633577

Olson DJ, Gore JL, Daratha KB, Roberts KP. Travel Burden and Direct Medial Costs of Urologic Surgery.JHEOR 2016;4(1):47-54.

Fritz, R.L., Corbett, C.L., Vandermause, R., & Cook, D. (2016). The influence of culture on older adults’ adoption of smart home monitoring. Gerontechnology, 14(3), 146-156. doi:10.4017/gt.2016.14.3.010.00

Klein TA, Panther S, Woo t, Odom-Maryon T, Daratha K. Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Prescribing by Prescriber Type and Specialty in Oregon Medicaid. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology (in press).

Did we miss your publication? Please let us know so we can share next in the next newsletter! Please send a link to your publication to Kathy Bridwell so she can post it on the research publications board.


Recent Presentations

Washington State University, College of Nursing was well represented this year at the annual Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) conference, held in Anaheim, CA.  For a complete list of those who participated please click here.

Holliday, C., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Wynne, M., Ford, C., Numkena, N., Paul. R., & Katz, J. R. (2015).

Lederhos, C., Ramsay, S., Fletcher, J., Branen, L. (2016, April) Intergenerational transmission of feeding practices and styles: Adult-controlled or cooperative feeding in parent-child relationships across generations. Poster presented at the Inland Northwest Research Symposium, Spokane, WA.

Orr, M., Lederhos, C., Martin, S., Roll, J., & McPherson, S. (2016, April) A Methodology for Understanding Relative Reinforcement in Co-Addiction Treatment: An Example with Alcohol and Tobacco Use. Poster presented at the Inland Northwest Research Symposium, Spokane, WA.

Mbua M, Doutrich D, Phalen B. A quality improvement project to improve care coordination and reduce hospital readmission in patients with chronic illnesses. Poster session presented at WSU Vancouver Research Showcase; 2016 April 14, Vancouver WA.

Murphy, S.M., Polsky, D. (In press). Economic evaluations of opioid use disorder interventions. PharmacoEconomics. doi: 10.1007/s40273-016-0400-5

Lee, J.D., Friedmann, P.D., Kinlock, T.W., Nunes, E.V., Boney, T.Y., Hoskinson, Jr., R.A., Wilson, D., McDonald, R., Rotrosen, J., Gourevitch, M.N., Gordon, M., Fishman, M., Chen, D.T., Bonnie, R.J., Cornish, J.W., Murphy, S.M., O’Brien, C.P. (2016). Extended-release naltrexone to prevent opioid relapse in criminal justice offenders. New England Journal of Medicine, 74, 1232-1242. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1505409

Murphy, S.M., Campbell A.N.C., Ghitza U.E., Kyle T.L., Bailey G.L., Nunes E.V., Polsky D., (2016). Cost-effectiveness of an internet-delivered treatment for substance abuse: data from a multisite randomized controlled trial. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 161, 119-126. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.021

Nguyen-Truong, C.K. Y., Hsiao, C., Le, T. V., Tang, J., & Cheang, S. (to present on May 14, 2016). Unfolding Stories on the Spiral Model of Learning and the Empowerment Process in the Vietnamese Women’s Health Project. Creative Arts & Storytelling Presentation. Community-Campus Partnerships for Health 14th International Conference: Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships. New Orleans, LA.

Nguyen-Truong, C., Lee-Lin, F., Hassouneh, D., Hsiao, C., Le, T. V., & Tang, J. (to present on April 28, 2016). Delayed or Not to be Screened for Cervical Cancer Among Vietnamese Women – Provider and Client Communication Interaction Approach. Electronic Poster Presentation. Oncology Nursing Society 41st Annual Congress. San Antonio, TX.

Nguyen-Truong, C., Hsiao, C., & Tang, J. (to present on April 29, 2016). Community Interactive Research Workshop Series – Community Members Engaged as Team Teachers to Conduct Research. Podium Presentation. Oncology Nursing Society 41st Annual Congress. San Antonio, TX.

Schiavenato, M. Notes from the trenches: Early stage company commercialization paths. [Invited, Panel Member]. 9th Annual Life Science Leadership Summit. March 31, 2016; Spokane, WA.

 McCabe, M., Ward, L. D., & Ricciardi, C. (2016). Web-based assessment of genomic knowledge among practicing nurses: A validation study. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 47(4), 189-196.

 Wilson, M., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Mason, A., Graham, K., Shuen, J.A., Wilson, M. “Testing an internet-based depression management program for people with chronic illnesses and depressive symptoms”, Inland Northwest Research Symposium, Spokane, WA, April 2016.

Did we miss your presentation? Please let us know so we can share next month!


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they highlight the results of a large multinational trial that found a vaginal ring provides partial protection from HIV.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – This month they present the NINR Workshop for Midcareer Scientists at Regional Nursing Research Society Conferences.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH – This month they highlight the pending pending changes to NIH application forms.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they remind us of the importance of organ donation.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share results from a study that found a breakthrough in understanding human skin cells offers a pathway for new anti-ageing treatments.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

 

Puzzle key: confidence, control, covariate, deviation “…in a footnote!”

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – April 2016

Marian Wilson


What’s New in Grants?

Six new proposals were submitted in March for a total of $2,079,407 in requested funding. Spokane and Vancouver submitted three proposals each.

The Research Office is here to help you with your submission. Let us know as soon as you decide to apply as we can help you explore funding opportunities and set up regular meetings to support your submission. Contact Kathy Bridwell for more information.


Congratulations!

Ruth Bryant placed second in the 3 minute thesis presentation held in Pullman 3/22/16.  She won a $1,500 scholarship to support conference travel.

Cindy Corbett was an invited review panel member for the following special emphasis Federal review panels: National Institute for Nursing Research P20/P30 Centers on Self-Management, March 2016, National Science Foundation, Multidisciplinary health-related panel, February 2016, and National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Kidney Translation R18 panel, February 2016.

Denise Smart received $365,880 from the TriService Nursing Research Program for her two year project titled Effects of Sleep Deficiency on National Guard Personnel Responding to Disasters.

Did we miss your good news? Please let us know so we can share in our next newsletter!


Research Wisdom

by Janet Katz

Janet Katz

Research Wisdom? How well do these words go together? Research is a constant state of not knowing but seeking to know while wisdom is a profound knowing gained by years of living.

Impact factor

Speaking of not knowing and asking questions–here is my question:

Should journal impact factor be used to evaluate faculty scholarship? I would answer no to the question and here is why:

As some of you know, one of my personal professional pet peeves (did you know that term comes from the 14th century word “peevish?” To be irritated and “pet” comes from being peevish about a person you are close to?) is impact factor, let me provide some background as foundation to the criticism.

Background

  • 1960s, Eugene Garfield created the journal impact factor (JIF) so that libraries could judge which journals to buy
  • 1992, Per Seglen found that only 15% of articles account for the JIF rating
  • 85% have below average citations. In other words those 15% had lots of citations making the journal have a high JIF
  • What was meant to guide librarians’ purchasing decisions has come to determine grant funding and promotions

What is Impact Factor?  IF=  # times an average article is cited in 2 years

total # “citable” articles published in 2 years

Criticism

There are different ways to look at this numerical designation, but what makes me peevish is the idea that what you have to say means more if published in one journal over another. What about innovation? What about novel ideas? Science is built on the idea that inquiry can and should take many different twists and turns. What if you are one of the few people studying something so that no one will cite you because no one is working on the same thing? » continue reading


Research FYI

Please be sure to cast your vote for nominations for the 2016 Spring Faculty,Staff, and Student Awards. Nominations are due April 11.

Call for Proposals: 15th Anniversary Council/Partners Nurse Scientist Research Grant a $15,000 research grant is being awarded to PhDs who have not yet received a NIH RO1 or comparable research award.  Applications are due 6/1/16.

AHRQ’s Chartbook on Health Care for Blacks, derived from the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report, summarizes trends in health care disparities by race related to access, Heckler Report priorities, and National Quality Strategy priorities. Key findings include increases in suicide and mental health disparities, improvements in access to care since the Affordable Care Act, and poorer quality of care related to person-centeredness and care coordination.

Mental Health Disorders in Elderly People Receiving Home Care: Prevalence and Correlates in the National U.S. Population found 40% of the elderly people receiving home care surveyed had a mental health disorder but only a third was receiving care for it.

How to (seriously) read a scientific paper offers great tips to get the most out of your time and experience when reading research papers.

Ten Ways to Know you’re Burning Out offers a list of 10 things to help you assess if it may be time to make a different decision before things get worse.

Statisticians issue warning over misuse of P values describes how the overuse of P values is contributing to a lack of reproduciblity in research.

Most Dangerous Time at the Hospital? It May Be When You Leave explores the dangers in transitioning patients from the hospital to the community.

Significant link between nightmares, suicidal behavior: Sleep problems have been identified as a risk for suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts, explores the relationship between nightmares and suicidal behaviors.


Research – Just for Fun

speed-bumps-appendicitis-article

Ouch!  In case you were wondering, it hurts when you have an appendicitis and drive over a speed bump.

Pain Over Speed Bumps in Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Diagnostic Accuracy Study,” Helen F. Ashdown, Nigel D’Souza, Diallah Karim, Richard J. Stevens, Andrew Huang, and Anthony Harnden, BMJ, vol. 345, 2012, e8012


Research Funnies

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Research Puzzle

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Recent Publications

Barron, S. (2016). Anencephaly: An ongoing investigation in Washington State. American Journal of Nursing; 116(3): 60 – 66.

Postma, J., Younglove, L Burbacher, T., Butterfield, P.W., Odom-Maryon, T., Brooks, K., Butterfield, P.G., Cederblom, N., Grant, K., Beresford, K., Tapia, N., Faustman, E. (In press). Ensuring Hispanic Representation in the National Children’s Study, Grant County, WA Sample. Journal of Health Disparity Research and Practice.

Schenk, Elizabeth C. PhD, MHI, RN; Mayer, Dorothy “Dale M. PhD, RN; Ward-Barney, Erin RN; Estill, Pamela MSN, RN; Goss, Lola AAS; Shreffler-Grant, Jean PhD, RN. RN Perceptions of a Newly Adopted Electronic Health Record. JONA: the Journal of Nursing Administration. 46(3) March 2016 139-145.

Did we miss your publication? Please let us know so we can share next in the next newsletter! Please send a link to your publication to Kathy Bridwell so she can post it on the research publications board.


Recent Presentations

Dr. Connie K. Y. Nguyen-Truong.  Oncology Nursing Society Foundation Congress Scholar. Oncology Nursing Society Foundation Congress Scholarship, Educational Grant, $1,200. Educational training in research, education, and practice at the ONS 41st Annual Congress in San Antonio, Texas. April 28, 2016 to May 1, 2016.

Dr. Connie K. Y. Nguyen-Truong.  Washington State University Vancouver Mentee (with External Mentor Frances Lee-Lin, PhD, RN, OCN®, CNS, Associate Professor, at Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, in partnership with Asian Health & Service Center, Portland, Oregon), Professional Development Enhancement of an Early Care for Health Co-Principal Investigator. Washington State University Vancouver External Mentoring Program of the Office of Research and Graduate Education. $2,403.18. December 18, 2015 to June 30, 2016.

Dr. Connie Nguyen-Truong, C.K. Y., Dr. Davis, A., Jankowiak, C., Dr. Rasmor, M., & Dr .Dekker, L. (February 19, 2016). Promoting Reflective Practice and Equity in Empowered Learning: Participatory Panel Journey of Aesthetic Expression. Symposium. 12th Annual International Globalization, Diversity, and Education Conference. Airway Heights, WA. International, Referred.

Did we miss your presentation? Please let us know so we can share next month!


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they discuss the higher risk for suicide as well as for depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions for children with Cushing syndrome. These symptoms persisted after treatment.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – This month they explore the lower mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery at Magnet hospitals Additionally, sevicices and magnet hospitals had the same or lower costs as other hospitals.

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH – This month they ask reader to contribute to the NIH and FDA’s request for feedback on a proposed clinical trial protocol template.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. This month they announce that $94 million in Affordable Care Act funding will go to 271 health centers in 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico to improve and expand the delivery of substance abuse services in health centers, with a specific focus on treatment of opioid use disorders in underserved populations.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. This month they look to brain activity to discover why some people experience stressful situations differently than others.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource

Coug Nurse Scholarly Review – March 2016

Marian Wilson


What’s New in Grants?

Nineteen new proposals were submitted in February; 14 with Nursing Principal Investigators and five with Nursing and HPA Co-investigators, for a total of $17,043,331 in requested funding. Of the 19 proposals, 14 were submitted in Spokane, four in Vancouver, and one in Tri-Cities. Collaborating colleges/departments include Biological Sciences, Community Health, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science, Medicine, Pharmacy, Psychology, and Nutrition and Exercise Physiology.

If you will be a co-investigator on a proposal with someone in another department/college, please let Kathy Bridwell in the Nursing Research Office know. Also be sure that Kathy and Brett Oglesbee are on the eREX as department contacts, and Tamara Odom-Maryon is on the eREX as the college approver.

The Research Office is here to help you with your submission. Let us know as soon as you decide to apply as we can help you explore funding opportunities and set up regular meetings to support your submission. Contact Kathy Bridwell for more information.


Congratulations!

Celestina Barbosa-Leiker received $20,000 for her project titled Jonas Nurse Leader/Veterans Healthcare Scholars Program 2016-18 for two PhD students to participate in the Jonas Scholar program from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing/Jonas Center. » Read news release

Linda Eddy received $66,750 for her project titled Ombudsman/Quality Review Team Training from the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

Lois James received $12,500 from WSU Office of Commercialization: Commercialization Gap, for her project titled Counter Bias Training to Repair Damaged Police Community Relationships.

Did we miss your good news? Please let us know so we can share in our next newsletter!


Research Wisdom

Jae Kennedy

On Linking Health Research and Policy
By Jae Kennedy

Many current healthcare research articles begin with offhand reference to health reform, e.g. “following passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, payers and policymakers are paying increasing attention to…” It’s a rather transparent bid to assert timeliness and relevance to the study topic, but the policy doesn’t really drive the problem framing, analysis strategy, or interpretation of study findings. The study may be quite rigorous and focus on an important problem, but it’s not about the policy referenced in the first or second paragraph. That’s fine, by the way, there are many types of really important research questions that don’t have a clear link to public policies or programs.

Many of you know that I recently received a fairly large federal grant to evaluate the impact of recent federal policy reforms on the physical, emotional and economic health of working-age adults with significant disabilities. I’m proud of the proposed work, and excited about the potential impact. As someone who has spent over half his life doing research on health and social services, I would advise researchers who aspire to influence policy to be: a) critical, b) practical, c) humble, and d) persistent.

Critical analysis
Most legislation, regulation and program development is grounded in a set of general assumptions about human and organizational behavior. Policymakers assume that individuals or groups will rationally respond to changing incentives and reallocation of resources. Evaluation scientists like Leonard Bickman stress the critical importance of program theory – the causal models which lead us to hypothesize that a given intervention will lead to a desired outcome within a target population.

Pulling apart and critically analyzing the assumptions underlying an intervention is the first step in any policy research. Ask some basic questions: Why do we think this can work, how can we tell that it works, and is this the most (quick, cheap, or effective) way to reach the desired outcome? Think about generalizability – do we think this will work in other settings or with different populations? » Continue reading


Research FYI

  • In Developmental Inhibition of Gsk3 Rescues Behavioral and Neurophysiological Deficits in a Mouse Model of Schizophrenia Predisposition (Tamura, M, Makai, J, Gordon, J, Gogogos, J) scientists were able to eliminate a core symptom of schizophrenia in mice.
  • The New York Times’ blog by Abby Ellin, explores the challenges transgender patients face when going to the hospital. Expecting all healthcare providers to be experts in +transgender medicine is not feasible but practitioners must turn to experts in order to provide appropriate and responsible care. » Read the full article.
  • Research findings can take years to make it to publication. This month in Nature, Kendall Powel asks the Question “Does it take too long to publish research?”
  • Dr. Bill Thomas thinks we are lucky to get old. After deciding to leave a high stress ER position, the Harvard trained physician became the director of a small town Nursing home. The depressing conditions he witnessed there and his experience growing up surrounded by thriving older people led him to develop the Eden Alternative; a nursing home approach that incorporates the care of animals and plants into nursing homes, and the residents thrived! So why hasn’t this simple approach been widely adopted? » Read more
  • Submitted by Cindy Corbett: The American Nurses Foundation would like to announce the opening of our 2016 Nursing Research Grant cycle. Interested faculty and doctoral students may click here for more information or to apply for a Nursing Research Grant. The deadline is May 1, 2016.
  • Submitted by Martin Schiavenato: Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science, published in Science last year, shares the results from the replication of 100 experiments in three high-ranking psychology journals. They found that 97% of original studies had significant results (P < .05) but only 36% of replications had significant results. This does not necessarily mean that only a third of the results are “true,” rather, to be statistically significant its p-value is less than 0.05, this means you have a 1 in 20 of experiencing this by chance. » Read more

Upcoming Changes to NIH Forms

Submitted by Kathy Bridwell: There will be changes to some of NIH Form C and D Application Forms the end of March 2016. Be sure to use the most recent version when working on your applications. The following highlights some of the changes:

1. Authentication of Key Biological and/or Chemical Resources attachment

  • New form;
  • Additional review questions;
  • Guidance for the Significance and Approach Sections of the Research Strategy required for research grant applications (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-16-011.html) and Career Development Award applications (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-16-012.html); and
  • New RPPR expectations “to emphasize rigorous approaches taken to ensure robust and unbiased results.”
  • Research Training: Updated requirements and instructions for several attachments on the PHS 398 Research Training Program Plan form. Changes affect Human Subjects, Vertebrate Animals, and Progress Report attachments. Also, new requirement to focus on recruitment in “Recruitment and Retention Plan to Enhance Diversity” attachment.

2. Simplification of the Vertebrate Animals Section of NIH Grant Applications and Contract Proposals. The VAS criteria are simplified by the following changes: description of veterinary care and justification for number of animals are no longer required, and description of the method of euthanasia is required only if the method is not consistent with AVMA guidelines (For more details, please see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-16-006.html).

3. Inclusion of Children in Clinical Research: Change in NIH Definition. Child is now defined as under 18 rather than 21 (See http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-16-010.html).


Research – Just for Fun

Kitten at computer

This month’s submission comes from Computers in Human Behavior. Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect? (Jessica Myrick) surveyed 6,795 internet users and among other findings, found that there is a relationship between viewing cat videos and emotional benefits. » Read the full article


Research Funnies

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Research Hide and Seek

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Recent Publications

Katz, J. R., Barbosa-Leiker, C., & Benavides-Vaello, S. (2016). Measuring the Success of a Pipeline Program to Increase Nursing Workforce Diversity. Journal of Professional Nursing. 32 (1) doi:10.1016/j.profnurs.2015.05.003

McPherson, S., Brooks, O., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Lederhos, C., Lamp, A., Murphy, S., Layton, M., & Roll, J. (2016). Examining longitudinal stimulant use and treatment attendance as parallel outcomes in two contingency management randomized clinical trials. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 61, 18-25.

Hirchak, K.A. & Murphy, S.M. (In press). Assessing differences in the availability of opioid addiction therapy options: Rural versus urban and American Indian reservation versus non-reservation. Journal of Rural Health.

Murphy, S.M., Campbell A.N.C., Ghitza U.E., Kyle T.L., Bailey G.L., Nunes E.V., Polsky D., (2016). Cost-effectiveness of an internet-delivered treatment for substance abuse: data from a multisite randomized controlled trial. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.021

Keegan, R, Oliver, C., Stanfill, T., Stevens, K., Brown, G., Ebinger, M.,& Gay, J. (2015). Use of a mobile device simulation as a preclass active learning exercise. Journal of Nursing Education. Doi. 10.3928/01484834-20151214-14.

Simonson, D. (2016). Staffing: A Spreadsheet That Spits Out a Staffing Budget. Outpatient Surgery Magazine, XVII(1).

Shaw, M.R., Lederhos, C., Howell, D., Haberman, M., Fleming, S. & Roll, J. (2016) Nurses’ perceptions of caring for childbearing women who misuse opioids. The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, 41(1), 37-42.

Benavides-Vaello, S. Stevens, K., & Vines, M. (2014). Evaluating Spanish proficiency among interprofessional healthcare students using simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing. 10(4):e169–e175. DOI.1016/j.ecns.2014.01.001

Ward, L. D., French, B. F., Barbosa-Leiker, C., & Iverson, A.E.F. (2016). Application of exploratory factor analysis and item response theory to validate the Genomic Nursing Concept Inventory. Journal of Nursing Education, 55(1), 9-17. doi:10.3928/01484834-20151214-05

Read, C. Y., & Ward, L. D. (2016) Faculty performance on the Genomic Nursing Concept Inventory. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 48(1), 5-13. doi:10.1111/jnu.12175

Senger, B.A., Ward, L. D., Barbosa-Leiker, C. L., & Bindler, R. C. (2016). The parent experience of caring for a child with a mitochondrial disease. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 31(1), 32-41. doi:10.1016/j.pedn.2015.08/007

Senger, B.A., Ward, L. D., Barbosa-Leiker, C. L., & Bindler, R. C. (2016). Stress and coping of parents caring for a child with mitochondrial disease. Applied Nursing Research, 29(1), 195-201. doi:10.1016/j.apnr.2015.03.010

Did we miss your publication? Please let us know so we can share next in the next newsletter! Please send a link to your publication to Kathy Bridwell so she can post it on the research publications board.


Recent Presentations

Holliday, C., Barbosa-Leiker, C., Wynne, M., Ford, C., Numkena, N., Paul. R., &Katz, J. R. (2015). Community capacity for research:Intrinsic knowledge and making connections. Podium presentation 41st Annual Conference of the Transcultural Nursing Society (TCNS). Portland OR.

Holliday, C., Wynecoop, Z., Wynne, M., Numkena, N., & Katz, J. R. (2015). Ta hec čmiš qn mistI Will Never Give Up: Preventing American Indian Youth Suicide & Substance Use with CBPR & The Gathering of Native Americans. American Indigenous Research Association 2015 Conference. Polson, MT.

James, L. (January 2016). Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) F-Division Fatigue Management Training Pilot Study: Executive and Managers’ Forum. Regina, Canada

James, L. (January 2016). Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) F-Division Fatigue Management Training Pilot Study: Members and Spouses’ Workshop. Regina, Canada

Did we miss your presentation? Please let us know so we can share next month!


Helpful and Interesting Links

National Institute of Health (NIH) News & Events – This month they highlight the results of a large multinational trial that found a vaginal ring provides partial protection from HIV.

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)News and Notes” – This month they present the NINR Workshop for Midcareer Scientists at Regional Nursing Research Society Conferences

The NIH Extramural News is a blog written to address current issues related to research and NIH – This month they highlight the pending changes in the NIH application forms.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) continues to provide funding and resources for improving access to health care. – This month they remind us of the importance of organ donation.

Science Daily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in health, technology, the environment, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. – This month they share results from a study that found a breakthrough in understanding human skin cells offers a pathway for new anti-aging treatments.

WSU Informer: Funding Opportunities Resource