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The Impact of Suicide Assessment Training on Nursing Practice

WSU Spokane (Internal)
Faculty Seed Grant Program 2014 Competition
9/1/2014 – Ongoing

Abstract

Approximately 35,000 people in the United States die by suicide each year, making suicide a leading public health concern. Nurses routinely treat patients that are considering suicide, but these patients are rarely identified as at-risk. In addition, suicide in hospitals is three times the rate as compared to the general population. Yet, suicide assessment training for nurses is lacking. Through proper identification and assessment of patients at-risk for suicidal behavior, suicide can be prevented. The purpose of this study is to 1) Evaluate the impact that online suicide prevention/assessment training has on RNs’ knowledge, attitudes and skills; and 2) Describe RNs’ perceptions and experience with online suicide prevention/assessment training and the impact it has on their practice. In order to meet the above objectives, this study will use a multi-method design. A pre-post, repeated measures design will be used to examine changes in knowledge, attitude, and skills resulting from a 6-hour suicide assessment training course. Content analysis of audiotaped phone interviews conducted at 3 months post-training will be used to examine changes in RNs’ practice as a result of the training. The proposed study is needed in order to understand how and if suicide assessment training impacts nursing practice.

Primary Investigator

Carrie Holliday
Carrie Holiday, PhD

Co-Investigator

Tamara Odom-Maryon, PhD