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Mutual effects of sleep and pain in Veterans with chronic pain: A supplemental grant to R01: Hypnosis and Meditation for Pain Management in Veterans: Efficacy and and Mechanisms

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Mutual effects of sleep and pain in Veterans with chronic pain: A supplemental grant to R01: Hypnosis and Meditation for Pain Management in Veterans: Efficacy and and Mechanisms

Abstract

This supplemental study relates directly to the parent study’s primary aim to understand how and why non-pharmacological treatments are effective. The current project will increase knowledge of the bidirectional relationship between sleep and pain. We will assess early changes in sleep and pain among a subsample of 135 Veterans enrolled in the parent study, which is a randomized controlled trial evaluating self-hypnosis and mindfulness meditation for chronic pain. We will add sleep measurements pre-treatment, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up to investigate how changes in sleep and pain are related, relative to a control group. We will measure sleep both subjectively, by self-report of sleep quality, and objectively, through wrist actigraphy-assessed sleep duration, as either or both facets of sleep may be therapeutically relevant. Our findings will contribute novel information regarding mechanisms of complementary therapies for chronic pain, specifically with regard to how improving sleep early in the course of treatment may affect pain and how sleep and pain symptoms relate.

Primary Investigators

Marian Wilson, PhD
Mark Jensen, PhD
Rhonda Williams, PhD

Co-Investigators

Hans Van Dongen, PhD