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Julie Postma
Community Project Targets Asthma

TACOMA, Wash. – Patient-centered research to improve the quality of life for those affected by asthma is one of five Washington state projects to receive funding recently from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, or PCORI.

The project will focus on developing strategic partnerships between individuals, families and communities affected by asthma and health care partners interested in promoting asthma prevention and management.

An Interprofessional Approach to Chronic Care

There is growing recognition that complex health issues are best addressed by interprofessional teams of health care providers. For the past few years, WSU has been providing opportunities for students from different health disciplines to learn and work together. A new grant-funded project is going to take this to the next level while improving care for patients with multiple chronic conditions who live in rural or medically underserved areas.

“This program is really going to let us build out our rural focus to an even greater degree,” said assistant professor of nursing Cindy Fitzgerald, the program director on the project.

Nursing Pathways high school students
New grant aims to diversify nursing workforce in Tri-Cities & Yakima

SPOKANE, Wash. – The WSU College of Nursing has received a new federal grant designed to expand a program to diversify the nursing workforce in the Tri-Cities and Yakima.

The purpose of the three-year, $1,041,000 grant from the Health Resources Service Administration (HRSA) is to continue to serve students from disadvantaged groups who are interested in pursuing nursing careers, according to College of Nursing associate professor Janet Katz. It builds upon an initial HRSA grant, awarded in 2010, that set up the infrastructure for the program.

Becky Doughty
Rebecca Doughty: A WSU College of Nursing PhD Student Success Story
WSU, Spokane Tribe Wins Grant to Address Youth Issues

By Doug Nadvornick

SPOKANE, Wash. – The WSU College of Nursing and the Spokane Tribe of Indians are beginning a new project aimed at helping the tribe deal more effectively with substance abuse and mental health problems among its youth.

They’ve won a three-year, $825,000 grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (an arm of the National Institutes of Health) to conduct a community-based participatory research project.

New Nursing Grant Promotes Chronic Care Intervention

By Doug Nadvornick

The WSU College of Nursing has secured a $1.3 million federal grant to teach people with multiple chronic health issues how to better manage their conditions.

Nursing associate dean for research Cindy Corbett says the four-year National Institute on Aging grant pairs her college with Aging and Long Term Care of Eastern Washington and the Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS). She says the project will use a chronic care management model adopted by the Washington Department of Social and Health Services.

Martin Schiavenato
Pain Meter for Preemies

By Linda Childers

If Martin Schiavenato, RN, PhD, were to gaze into a crystal ball, he would envision a future in which patients no longer experience pain or suffering.

Schiavenato, who until recently was an assistant professor at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, has spent the past several years working with a team of medical engineers to create an orb-like device that has the ability to assess pain in premature infants. The device, which resembles a crystal ball, uses sensors to monitor a patient’s behavioral and physiological signs of pain. By notifying clinicians of a patient’s pain level, Schiavenato … » More …

Kids With Asthma Play Hard Too

WSU College of Nursing faculty Michele Shaw was featured in the Wall Street Journal for her research related to children with asthma.

A version of this article appeared April 22, 2013, on page D1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Kids With Asthma Play Hard, Too.

Children with asthma should play hard in gym class and stop worrying they might have an attack that could leave them struggling to breathe, respiratory specialists are now recommending. Physical activity by people with asthma isn’t harmful and might even be helpful to treating the condition, doctors in the field believe. A report … » More …

Team investigating perceptions of new L&I program

What happens when a bakery employee hurts his ankle while lifting a 50-pound bag of flour? In some cases, he might miss a week or two of work. But in the case of “Jerry,” he shifts to a job that allows him to stay at work, off his ankle, and decorate cakes until he’s healthy enough to go back to his regular position.

“Jerry” is a character in a new Washington State Department of Labor and Industries TV spot. The ad promotes the agency’s new Stay at Work program, which pays employers up to half of an injured worker’s base wages. In exchange, the employee … » More …

Doctoral student examines barriers to fitness after birth for military moms

By Doug Nadvornick

New mothers who serve as active duty military members share many of the same issues as new mothers in civilian life. But there is one difference: within a certain time period after giving birth – usually six months — military mothers are required to take fitness tests. Those who don’t pass the tests face negative consequences, such as unsatisfactory job evaluations or even discharge from the service.

The burden of having to take a fitness test causes plenty of stress for some new moms, says Nicole Armitage, a PhD student in the WSU College of Nursing. Armitage recently received a grant from … » More …

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