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Marian Wilson
Online Management Tools Help Ease Chronic Pain

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Marian WilsonSPOKANE, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found that people can manage chronic pain and reduce their reliance on opioids through an Internet-based program that teaches non-medical alternatives like increased physical activity, thinking more positively and dealing with emotions.

Marian Wilson, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing, tracked 43 people with chronic non-cancer pain as they went through an eight-week course of online tools to manage psychological, social and health issues associated with chronic pain. Compared to a similar-sized control group, the participants reported that they … » More …

Martin Schiavenato
WSU Researchers Hope to Track Preemie Pain

Published in the Journal of BusinessBy Samantha Howard

Martin Schiavenato

Washington State University researchers are developing a device that can detect pain in premature infants and might be used in the future to help prevent disabilities, says associate professor Martin Schiavenato, WSU College of Nursing.

“An infant’s central nervous system is not fully developed yet, and there’s mounting evidence that pain contributes to structural brain abnormalities that may lead or contribute to many cognitive and behavioral conditions,” Schiavenato says.

Martin Schiavenato
Martin Schiavenato Receives Life Science Discovery Funding (LSDF)

Martin Schiavenato

Washington State University College of Nursing Associate Professor Martin Schiavenato received funding for his work around premature infant pain detection. “LSDF grants help commercialize major medical breakthroughs and attract private funding from external investors,” says LSDF executive director John DesRosier. “These new awards help move promising treatments and diagnostics more quickly from the lab bench to patients in need.” Dr. Schiavenato’s grant received $235,000 for work to be completed over two years beginning in August 2015. His focus is to develop a device that detects, measures, and continuously reports pain levels in infants … » More …

Patricia Butterfield
WSU Spokane Receives Grant

Children’s Health Disparities Program Launched by Dean Emerita Patricia Butterfield, Chancellor Lisa Brown & the Spokane Teaching Health Clinic (STHC)

SPOKANE, Wash. – Healthy housing is the focus of a novel collaboration between Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane and its community neighbors, funded by a $100,000 grant from the Smith-Barbieri Progressive Fund.

The “University-Community Partnership to Reduce Children’s Health Disparities” will foster student engagement, innovative practice at Spokane’s Teaching Health Clinic and research addressing healthy housing.

The project is inspired by WSU College of Nursing professor Patricia Butterfield’s research on substandard housing and environmental health risks.

“Our previous research, conducted in Montana and … » More …

Patricia Butterfield
Grant Money Will Help WSU Dial up Children’s Health

By Shanon Quinn, Daily News staff writer

Patricia ButterfieldWashington State University Spokane’s medical clinic is not expected to open for more than a year, but its first community health-related project has already begun, nursing professor Patricia Butterfield said Wednesday.

The project, University-Community Partnership to Reduce Children’s Health Disparities, is funded by a $100,000 grant from the Smith-Barbieri Progressive Fund and will focus on identifying and reducing health risks in the home for families – and particularly children – in poverty.

“Every child has to sleep somewhere,” Butterfield said. “The safety of their home, the quality of … » More …

Martin Schiavenato
Schiavenato Receives LSDF

Martin Schiavenato

Washington State University College of Nursing Associate Professor Martin Schiavenato received funding for his work around premature infant pain detection. “LSDF grants help commercialize major medical breakthroughs and attract private funding from external investors,” says LSDF executive director John DesRosier. “These new awards help move promising treatments and diagnostics more quickly from the lab bench to patients in need.” Dr. Schiavenato’s grant received $235,000 for work to be completed over two years beginning in August 2015. His focus is to develop a device that detects, measures, and continuously reports pain levels in infants … » More …

New Year, New Master’s Degree

This January, WSU Spokane’s Department of Health Policy and Administration (MHPA) officially joined the WSU College of Nursing, adding to and enhancing graduate degree offerings. “Students will gain access to complementary courses and electives across programs (the MHPA and the college’s existing Master of Nursing program). Research collaboration across disciplines will continue for faculty and students, adding to the interprofessional education foundational to the WSU Spokane Health Sciences campus,” said Cindy Fitzgerald, associate dean for academic affairs.

BACKGROUND
The MHPA has been offered since 1995 at WSU Spokane, and the Department of HPA was established in 2002, making it the first Department to … » More …

Nurse Practitioner Kathryn Sander
Prescription for Nurse Practitioners

With more ARNPs, patients may be left wondering who should provide their care

Nurse Practitioner Kathryn SanderBy Chelsea Bannach – originally published in InHealth Magazine

Kathryn Sander can care for patients from birth to death. As a family nurse practitioner for CHAS Health, Sander treats patients with a variety of illnesses, focusing on management of chronic disease such as diabetes and hypertension.

Sarah Barron
Fatal birth defect stalks 3 Central Washington counties

WSU Tri-Cities Nursing instructor Sarah Barron was highlighted today on the front page of the Seattle Times for her discovery of an abnormally high number of birth defects in Central Washington. Her discovery of this public health issue three years ago is finally leading to more investigation by the state officials.

As a mysterious cluster of rare birth defects grows in Yakima, Benton and Franklin counties, state health officials are conducting first interviews with women who lost babies to the devastating disorder known as anencephaly.

By JoNel Aleccia – originally published in Seattle Times

Sarah Barron» More …

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