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Matin Schiavenato
In the palms of our hands: RN sets sights on developing tool to measure infants’ pain

Matin Schiavenato

Originally Published by Nurse.com on February 29, 2016

By Martin Schiavenato, PhD, RN

I will never forget her name. As an NICU nurse, I was accustomed to working with preemies and micro-preemies — babies small enough to fit entirely in the palm of my hand, and I have very small hands. Jessica* was different. She was full-term and appeared so beautifully healthy. Unfortunately she suffered from a genetic disorder that rendered her skin useless; her epithelium would … » More …

Mary Lee Roberts, PhD student in lab
WSU College of Nursing Receives RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars Grant to Prepare PhD Nurses

Mary Lee Roberts, PhD student in lab
Multi-funder initiative aims to help reach Institute of Medicine goal to build the next generation of PhD prepared nursing leaders.

Spokane, WA – WSU College of Nursing is one of only 32 schools of nursing nationwide to receive a grant to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing Scholars program will provide financial support, mentoring, and leadership development to nurses who commit to earn their PhDs … » More …

Nicole Armitage
PhD to Policy Change: How one Scholar’s Research Informed Policy Change in the U.S. Air Force

Nicole-Armitage

By Alli Benjamin

Following childbirth, many new moms are advised by their doctor to take one year to heal and return to pre-pregnancy weight. For active duty women in the U.S. Air Force, this wasn’t an option until March 2015, when the policy changed that required new mothers returning to work to pass a rigorous fitness test just six months after giving birth.

This policy change was informed by data gathered and published by Nursing alumna Nicole … » More …

Jae Kennedy
Study to Examine Affordable Care Act, Those with Disabilities

By Eric Sorensen, WSU

A Washington State University researcher will lead a $2.5 million examination of the federal Affordable Care Act’s impact on what may be the largest group in need of its services: people with disabilities.

 

Jae Kennedy“Their service needs are different and their health needs are more intensive,” said Jae Kennedy, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Administration, College of Nursing, WSU Spokane. “There are a lot of reasons why this is an important population to study and make sure that the legislation is living up to its promise.”

» More …

Marian Wilson
Women are More Likely to Talk About Pain, Study Finds

Marian Wilson

WSU researchers say new approach reduces pill use

By LeAnn Bjerken – originally published in the Journal of Business
Dr. Marian Wilson, a second-year assistant professor at Washington State University Spokane, found in a study on chronic pain that women seem more open than men to participating in studies and sharing their symptoms.

“To me, it’s a very positive thing, seeing this amount of women who are willing to participate in open discussions of chronic pain,” says Wilson. “At the same time, it makes me worry about the men, as they … » More …

Concussion a Disproportionate Healthcare Cost to Society

Janessa GravesSPOKANE, Wash. – Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in children are costly to individuals and society. A new study shows that, though moderate and severe TBI cost more for the individuals involved, there are so many more cases of mild TBI, such as concussions, that their cost to the general population is much higher.

The study is important because it provides evidence that mild TBI prevention strategies could lead to significant cost savings, said lead author Janessa Graves, assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Washington State University, who did the research with the University … » More …

Marian Wilson
Online Management Tools Help Ease Chronic Pain

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Marian WilsonSPOKANE, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have found that people can manage chronic pain and reduce their reliance on opioids through an Internet-based program that teaches non-medical alternatives like increased physical activity, thinking more positively and dealing with emotions.

Marian Wilson, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing, tracked 43 people with chronic non-cancer pain as they went through an eight-week course of online tools to manage psychological, social and health issues associated with chronic pain. Compared to a similar-sized control group, the participants reported that they … » More …

Martin Schiavenato
WSU Researchers Hope to Track Preemie Pain

Published in the Journal of BusinessBy Samantha Howard

Martin Schiavenato

Washington State University researchers are developing a device that can detect pain in premature infants and might be used in the future to help prevent disabilities, says associate professor Martin Schiavenato, WSU College of Nursing.

“An infant’s central nervous system is not fully developed yet, and there’s mounting evidence that pain contributes to structural brain abnormalities that may lead or contribute to many cognitive and behavioral conditions,” Schiavenato says.

Martin Schiavenato
Martin Schiavenato Receives Life Science Discovery Funding (LSDF)

Martin Schiavenato

Washington State University College of Nursing Associate Professor Martin Schiavenato received funding for his work around premature infant pain detection. “LSDF grants help commercialize major medical breakthroughs and attract private funding from external investors,” says LSDF executive director John DesRosier. “These new awards help move promising treatments and diagnostics more quickly from the lab bench to patients in need.” Dr. Schiavenato’s grant received $235,000 for work to be completed over two years beginning in August 2015. His focus is to develop a device that detects, measures, and continuously reports pain levels in infants … » More …

Patricia Butterfield
WSU Spokane Receives Grant

Children’s Health Disparities Program Launched by Dean Emerita Patricia Butterfield, Chancellor Lisa Brown & the Spokane Teaching Health Clinic (STHC)

SPOKANE, Wash. – Healthy housing is the focus of a novel collaboration between Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane and its community neighbors, funded by a $100,000 grant from the Smith-Barbieri Progressive Fund.

The “University-Community Partnership to Reduce Children’s Health Disparities” will foster student engagement, innovative practice at Spokane’s Teaching Health Clinic and research addressing healthy housing.

The project is inspired by WSU College of Nursing professor Patricia Butterfield’s research on substandard housing and environmental health risks.

“Our previous research, conducted in Montana and … » More …

Washington State University