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Sean Murphy
Sean Murphy Published in New England Journal of Medicine

Sean MurphyAssistant Professor Sean Murphy in the Health Policy and Administrative Department at WSU College of Nursing has jointly authored a paper that was published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. The article, “Opioid Relapse Rates Fall with Long-Term Use of Medication for Adults in Criminal Justice System,” was published online on March 31, 2016 and is based on research and analysis conducted in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, NYU Langone Medical Center, Brown University, … » More …

Two Fairfax Police Officers
This study found race matters in police shootings, but the results may surprise you

Two Fairfax Police Officers

Originally Published by Tom Jackman on April 27, 2016 in the Washington Post

The conventional thinking about police-involved shootings, and some scientific research, has been that black suspects are more likely to be shot than white suspects because of an implicit racial bias among police officers. But now a new study has found exactly the opposite: even with white officers who do have racial biases, officers are three times less likely to shoot unarmed black suspects than … » More …

Sara Barron
FDA Ruling on Folic Acid Could Reduce Anencephaly

RICHLAND, Wash. – A Washington State University nursing instructor says the recent announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowing folic acid to be fortified in corn-masa flour may help reduce the number of infants born without brains.

Sara Barron, a nurse and WSU Tri-Cities nursing instructor, said folic acid was proven to reduce the risk of spine and brain defects in babies in the 1980s. Starting in 1998, the FDA required that most grains be fortified with the supplement in order to provide American women with the amount needed to start a healthy pregnancy. This fortification dropped the rate of anencephaly in the … » More …

WSU Nursing Research: teen relationships & the path to recovery

Mary Roberts, PhD student researher

By Sarah Schaub

It was her memory of the conversation she had with the 16-year old female patient that kept Mary Roberts, a PhD in Nursing student at WSU, awake while conducting research as part of her studies. The young girl shared that like her mother, she had found prostitution as a means to support her drug addiction. Her story mirrored countless patients who entered chemical dependency (CD) treatment.

“After she entered the CD treatment facility, I could finally grieve for her. She was safe for now and could … » More …

Matin Schiavenato
In the palms of our hands: RN sets sights on developing tool to measure infants’ pain

Matin Schiavenato

Originally Published by Nurse.com on February 29, 2016

By Martin Schiavenato, PhD, RN

I will never forget her name. As an NICU nurse, I was accustomed to working with preemies and micro-preemies — babies small enough to fit entirely in the palm of my hand, and I have very small hands. Jessica* was different. She was full-term and appeared so beautifully healthy. Unfortunately she suffered from a genetic disorder that rendered her skin useless; her epithelium would … » More …

Mary Lee Roberts, PhD student in lab
WSU College of Nursing Receives RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars Grant to Prepare PhD Nurses

Mary Lee Roberts, PhD student in lab
Multi-funder initiative aims to help reach Institute of Medicine goal to build the next generation of PhD prepared nursing leaders.

Spokane, WA – WSU College of Nursing is one of only 32 schools of nursing nationwide to receive a grant to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing Scholars program will provide financial support, mentoring, and leadership development to nurses who commit to earn their PhDs … » More …

Nicole Armitage
PhD to Policy Change: How one Scholar’s Research Informed Policy Change in the U.S. Air Force

Nicole-Armitage

By Alli Benjamin

Following childbirth, many new moms are advised by their doctor to take one year to heal and return to pre-pregnancy weight. For active duty women in the U.S. Air Force, this wasn’t an option until March 2015, when the policy changed that required new mothers returning to work to pass a rigorous fitness test just six months after giving birth.

This policy change was informed by data gathered and published by Nursing alumna Nicole … » More …

Jae Kennedy
Study to Examine Affordable Care Act, Those with Disabilities

By Eric Sorensen, WSU

A Washington State University researcher will lead a $2.5 million examination of the federal Affordable Care Act’s impact on what may be the largest group in need of its services: people with disabilities.

 

Jae Kennedy“Their service needs are different and their health needs are more intensive,” said Jae Kennedy, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Administration, College of Nursing, WSU Spokane. “There are a lot of reasons why this is an important population to study and make sure that the legislation is living up to its promise.”

» More …

Marian Wilson
Women are More Likely to Talk About Pain, Study Finds

Marian Wilson

WSU researchers say new approach reduces pill use

By LeAnn Bjerken – originally published in the Journal of Business
Dr. Marian Wilson, a second-year assistant professor at Washington State University Spokane, found in a study on chronic pain that women seem more open than men to participating in studies and sharing their symptoms.

“To me, it’s a very positive thing, seeing this amount of women who are willing to participate in open discussions of chronic pain,” says Wilson. “At the same time, it makes me worry about the men, as they … » More …

Concussion a Disproportionate Healthcare Cost to Society

Janessa GravesSPOKANE, Wash. – Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in children are costly to individuals and society. A new study shows that, though moderate and severe TBI cost more for the individuals involved, there are so many more cases of mild TBI, such as concussions, that their cost to the general population is much higher.

The study is important because it provides evidence that mild TBI prevention strategies could lead to significant cost savings, said lead author Janessa Graves, assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Washington State University, who did the research with the University … » More …

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