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Strong, Brave, and Intelligent

Robbie Paul’s article “Strong, Brave and Intelligent” was recently published in the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC) magazine. To view or subscribe to the online magazine, visit the AIGC website.
Robbie Paul

By Robbie Paul

My name is Robbie Paul. I was born and raised on the Nez Perce Reservation in Craigmont, Idaho. I am a wife, mother, grandmother and auntie. My life’s journey has been full, challenging and rewarding. I was the 4th of 5 children and lived with my family on a ranch on the Camas Prairie. My mother was Maxine … » More …

New Nursing Transfer Agreement

WSU College of Nursing faculty are working with state leaders to support streamlining RN-BSN transfer programs between state community colleges and universities. This is an important step to help the state attempt to create a more seamless pathway for Registered Nurses to earn their Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
OLYMPIA — In a move to boost the number of nurses with bachelor’s degrees in Washington, the community and technical college system and four-year universities have reached a landmark agreement to create a shorter, smoother process for students to achieve the degree. A new statewide Associate in Nursing transfer agreement standardizes the way credits are … » More …

Susan Fleming Publishes Book

Susan Fleming

By Alli Benjamin

SPOKANE, Wash. – Intricate birth stories of interest to midwives, nurses, doctors and students combine with rugged Seattle pioneer history and some fictional characters in a new book by Washington State University assistant professor of nursing Susan Fleming.

She will read from her first book, “Seattle Pioneer Midwife: Alice Ada Wood Ellis – Midwife, Nurse & Mother to All,” at 7 p.m. March 6 at Auntie’s Book Store in Spokane and 7 p.m. April 11 at University Book Store in Seattle.

Evolution of birthing practice

In the early 1900s, 95 … » More …

Julie Postma
Community Project Targets Asthma

TACOMA, Wash. – Patient-centered research to improve the quality of life for those affected by asthma is one of five Washington state projects to receive funding recently from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, or PCORI.

The project will focus on developing strategic partnerships between individuals, families and communities affected by asthma and health care partners interested in promoting asthma prevention and management.

WSU, Spokane Tribe Wins Grant to Address Youth Issues

By Doug Nadvornick

SPOKANE, Wash. – The WSU College of Nursing and the Spokane Tribe of Indians are beginning a new project aimed at helping the tribe deal more effectively with substance abuse and mental health problems among its youth.

They’ve won a three-year, $825,000 grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (an arm of the National Institutes of Health) to conduct a community-based participatory research project.

New Nursing Grant Promotes Chronic Care Intervention

By Doug Nadvornick

The WSU College of Nursing has secured a $1.3 million federal grant to teach people with multiple chronic health issues how to better manage their conditions.

Nursing associate dean for research Cindy Corbett says the four-year National Institute on Aging grant pairs her college with Aging and Long Term Care of Eastern Washington and the Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS). She says the project will use a chronic care management model adopted by the Washington Department of Social and Health Services.

Martin Schiavenato
Pain Meter for Preemies

By Linda Childers

If Martin Schiavenato, RN, PhD, were to gaze into a crystal ball, he would envision a future in which patients no longer experience pain or suffering.

Schiavenato, who until recently was an assistant professor at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, has spent the past several years working with a team of medical engineers to create an orb-like device that has the ability to assess pain in premature infants. The device, which resembles a crystal ball, uses sensors to monitor a patient’s behavioral and physiological signs of pain. By notifying clinicians of a patient’s pain level, Schiavenato … » More …

Kids With Asthma Play Hard Too

WSU College of Nursing faculty Michele Shaw was featured in the Wall Street Journal for her research related to children with asthma.

A version of this article appeared April 22, 2013, on page D1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Kids With Asthma Play Hard, Too.

Children with asthma should play hard in gym class and stop worrying they might have an attack that could leave them struggling to breathe, respiratory specialists are now recommending. Physical activity by people with asthma isn’t harmful and might even be helpful to treating the condition, doctors in the field believe. A report … » More …

Team investigating perceptions of new L&I program

What happens when a bakery employee hurts his ankle while lifting a 50-pound bag of flour? In some cases, he might miss a week or two of work. But in the case of “Jerry,” he shifts to a job that allows him to stay at work, off his ankle, and decorate cakes until he’s healthy enough to go back to his regular position.

“Jerry” is a character in a new Washington State Department of Labor and Industries TV spot. The ad promotes the agency’s new Stay at Work program, which pays employers up to half of an injured worker’s base wages. In exchange, the employee … » More …

Kay Olson
Q & A With Kay Olson

Kay Olson-web

Kay Olson
Instructor – Tri-Cities

Where are you from?

Born in Flagstaff, AZ now live in Richland, WA.

What nursing site do you work at?

Tri-Cities.

Why did you choose nursing as a profession?

I had never really even thought about a career in nursing, but after my youngest child went to school I decided it was time for me to do something for myself, and so at 42 years old I went back to school. I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do … » More …

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